The Wiley Online Library e-Book Collection

Wiley Online Library

The library provides access to the full e-book catalog of the publisher Wiley, known primarily as a science publisher but which has a large number of social science and humanities titles in its catalog.

The Wiley e-Book Collection, part of the Wiley Online Library which includes all of Wiley’s publications, consists of over 20,000 book volumes. Not included in this collection are the very expensive reference sets or specialized series that Wiley produces. In order to determine if a book is available to R-MC users, browse the title lists or do a search and all accessible volumes will be clearly marked with an unlocked lock and the phrase Full Access

Image of a Wiley ebook with a green unlocked padlock next to it, and the words "full access."
Note green unlocked padlock and “Full Access” text

Subjects range from Civil Engineering to Archaeology to Accounting to Philosophy, and all books are available to all users at all times. Books can be downloaded in PDF in their entirety or chapter by chapter. Any book may be used for course textbooks or readings in addition to individual research. Check out this valuable collection, although you don’t have to check the books out to use them!

Library Anxiety? Is that a thing?

Did you know that when many people walk into a library they feel intimidated and anxious? Library anxiety is real, and has been well-documented by the library field. What is library anxiety? It is the sense that one should know all about libraries, know how to do research, know how to find both physical and electronic resources, and that not knowing how to do these thing is shameful and should be hidden. Grand reading rooms like the one below, and the idea that a student is surrounded by centuries of knowledge, can often be intimidating rather than inspirational.

Picture of study tables at the reading room in the Hunt Library, NCSU
Quiet Reading Room of the James B. Hunt, Jr. Library, North Carolina State University

Now there is research that suggests another phenomena prevalent among first-year students: overconfidence that they understand the library and how things work, and so library instruction or help is unnecessary. It is thought that this overconfidence comes stems from the use of Google and other search engines for any kind of information need. Students know how to search in a general search engine, and assume that those skills translate 1:1 into the research world. The truth is that they do, but those search abilities are only one piece of what is needed. There’s a lot more to research than just picking out good search terms or knowing how to use quotes around a search phrase.

You can learn more about library anxiety in this article from JSTOR Daily.

Libraries can be a little intimidating at first, but they are friendly, welcoming places, and R-MC Librarians are excited to help you learn your way around. In fact for many of us, working with students remains our favorite part of this job. Being asked to help a student with a project is never a bother!

If you have a final paper or project coming up and you aren’t sure about your topic, research question, or your sources, schedule an appointment with a research librarian at https://rmc.libcal.com/appointments.

Or, join us for our LNAP event (Long Night Against Procrastination) on May 7, 7-11pm! Bring your topic, project, idea, or paper with with you, no appointment needed, and Prof. Treneman and I will be there to help.

Library anxiety may be a thing, but it doesn’t have to hold you back!

Three on the Third – May

Three on the Third is a monthly series in which we highlight three books new to the library collection.  Summaries of the books are provided along with shelf location and a link to the item in the catalog.  This month we are featuring several exciting new additions to our POP collection.

The Promise of Wholeness 
by Eric Ehrke
Cover of the book the Promise of Wholeness.Henosis is the Greek word for oneness/unity. Since time immemorial this universal concept has been championed within traditional wisdom, ancient philosophy and theology. The psychoanalyst, Carl Jung referred our shared human experience with the phrase “collective unconscious,” while physicists use the term “quantum entanglement” to describe how every particle is inherently connected to the whole. The missing links between the wisdom of ancient philosophy and the startling insights within modern psychology to transform suffering, transcend circumstances, and increase our capacity for love are explored in The Promise of Wholeness.
BF161 .E385 2019
Catalog Link – The Promise of Wholeness


A Heart in a Body in the World

by Deb Caletti
Cover of the book A Heart in A Body in the WorldWhen everything has been taken from you, what else is there to do but run? From Seattle to Washington, DC, Annabelle is running through mountain passes and suburban landscapes, from long lonely roads to college towns. She’s not ready to think about the why yet, just the how – muscles burning, heart pumping, feet pounding the earth. But no matter how hard she tries, she can’t outrun the tragedy from the past year, or the person – The Taker – that haunts her. Followed by Grandpa Ed in his RV and backed by her brother and two friends (her self-appointed publicity team), Annabelle becomes a reluctant activist as people connect her journey to the trauma from her past. Her cross-country run gains media attention and she is cheered on as she crosses state borders, even thrown a block party and given gifts. The support would be nice, if Annabelle could escape the guilt and shame from what happened back home. They say it isn’t her fault, but she can’t feel the truth of that. Through welcome and unwelcome distractions, she just keep running to the destination that awaits her. There, she’ll finally face the miles of love and loss behind her…and what still lies ahead.
PS3603.A43 H4 2018
Catalog Link – A Heart in the Body in the World

 

Dear Evan Hansen
by Val Emmich
Cover of the book Dear Evan HansenEvan is shy, lonely, and bullied for it. He has a chance encounter with Connor Murphy–just before Connor commits suicide. Evan’s life suddenly gets turned around, and suddenly he isn’t invisible anymore to the girl of his dreams–Connor’s sister, Zoe, who believes Evan was Connor’s only friend. As Evan goes from being a nobody to everyone’s hero and a social media superstar, Evan is filled with confidence … until things start unraveling.

PS3605.M565 D43 2018
Catalog Link – Dear Evan Hansen

From Special Collections and Archives: Hymnals in the Methodist Collection

One of the many notable collections in the Flavia Reed Owen Special Collections and Archives is the Methodist Collection, the historic archive of the Virginia Conference of the United Methodist Church. Music has always been important part of Methodist church services, and the collection includes numerous hymnals.

Title page of Wesleyans Selections, a rare hymnal dated 1829.
Wesleyan Selections, 1820

This rare 1820 hymnal (only 4 known copies in libraries) was owned by Gabriel Poillon Disosway, a native New Yorker who became perhaps the strongest proponent for a college to be established by the Virginia Conference, ultimately leading to Randolph-Macon College in 1830. Disosway graduated from Columbia University in 1819 and came to Petersburg, where he was a great friend of Rev. Hezekiah Leigh and it has been hypothesized that Disosway is the one who most strongly influenced Leigh into pushing for a Methodist college in Virginia. Disosway was appointed to the committee formed in 1825 that looked at founding a college, although he left Virginia to return to New York in 1828 before the college became a reality. His original signature can be seen in the upper right hand corner of this title page, while the penciled name to the left of it was added later by someone else. It is unknown whether he left the hymnal behind when he went back to New York, gave it to a friend, or passed it on later to someone in Virginia.

Another rare hymnal in the collection, also with only 4 known copies in libraries, is this 1825 volume collected by Rev. Lewis Skidmore, of “…the latest social and camp-meeting hymns….” Camp meetings were evangelical religious gatherings held outdoors that were of particular importance in the spread of Methodism in the nineteenth century, and music played a big role at these revival meetings.

Tile page of "A choice selection of the latest social and camp-meeting hymns and spriitual songs..." compiled by Rev. Lewis Skidmore, 1825,
Rare hymnal compiled by Rev. Lewis Skidmore

To learn more about the Virginia Methodism Collection, please visit https://library.rmc.edu/library/specialcollections or email archives [at] rmc.edu.

 

Doing Research on a Film? Try FIAF International Index to Film Periodicals Database!

image for FIAF International Federation of Film Archives. Link to external site. Link will open in a new window.

This database from the International Federation of Film Archives (FIAF) is a collaborative effort produced by a group of more than 120 archives in over 65 countries that collect, restore, and exhibit films and cinema documentation spanning the entire history of film.

The FIAF International Index to Film Periodicals is essential for doing research in film studies.  The index contains over 500,000 article citations from more than 345 periodicals, including both academic and popular film journals, with approximately 50 in full text. Each entry consists of a full bibliographic description, an abstract and comprehensive headings (biographical names, film titles and general subjects). Also included in this database is The Treasures from the Film Archives dataset, a database containing information about the silent-era film holdings of many film archives from around the world. The database also contains the full text of several important film reference works such as the Oxford History of World Cinema and Film Analysis: A Norton Reader.  Additionally, the FIAF Affiliates’ Publications component indexes the books, pamphlets, programmes, and other materials published by FIAF.

2018-2023 Strategic Plan – Part 4, Strategic Areas 3-5

My last three posts have detailed the new mission and vision of the McGraw-Page Library, as well as the values and priorities that guide our decision-making, and our first two Strategic Areas. This month wraps up this series with a focus on Strategic Areas 3-5.

Library staff have met to discuss the timeline of when we want to accomplish these tasks over the next five years, and have also assigned an individual who is responsible for ensuring that progress is being made on these goals. The Library is working to develop an assessment plan, which, when done, will work with our strategic plan to ensure we are making appropriate progress.

As with any strategic plan, these goals are based on our understanding of our current environment. The specific objectives or goals may change if conditions (e.g., staffing, building, budget) change significantly.

Our Strategic Areas, Goals, and Objectives

III. Strengthen Special Collections & Archives.
  1. Improve discoverability of special collections and archive materials
    1. Create online finding aids that can be linked to Worldcat and our catalog
    2. Use online tools to highlight specific collections
  2. Prioritize digitization projects
    1. Finalize naming conventions, file organization, and workflow for digitizing SC&A materials
    2. Digitize R-MC Yearbooks
    3. Create an online exhibits commemorating the 150th anniversary of the College’s move to Ashland
    4. Identify other discrete digitization projects that will meet either a preservation and/or a promotion goal
  3. Improve housing and storage of existing collections to ensure their long-term preservation
IV. Increase engagement between the campus community and the library.
  1. Raise awareness of library resources, services, and events
    1. Establish consistent use of social media, posters, the library website, R-MC Life, and other tools as appropriate
  2. Engage campus users through a variety of means
    1. Establish relationships with new students
    2. Market staff expertise
  3. Launch and continue workshops, events, speakers, etc., that will forward the library’s goals, in partnership with others on campus where possible
    1. Student events that promote research support, specific resources, etc.
    2. Faculty events (e.g., scholar’s retreat)
V. Enhance our organizational effectiveness.
  1. Ensure that all staff positions are aligned with our strategic priorities
  2. Encourage and support professional development among library staff
  3. Highlight the Library’s role in student recruitment, retention, and success
  4. Improve communication internally (library-to-library) and externally (library-to-campus)
    1. Send regular library updates to library staff
    2. Communicate changes in hours to the campus
    3. Communicate new services, resources, events, etc., to campus
  5. Develop an assessment plan to inform decision making

National Library Workers Day: April 9, 2019

National Library Workers Day is a fitting time to acknowledge the recent passing of Eleanor Wallace (March 2, 1928 – March 18, 2019). Eleanor Wallace began working in the Cataloging Department in 1977 in what was then the Walter Hines Page Library. In 1987, a major library renovation and expansion resulted in today’s McGraw-Page Library. As part of the library’s make-over, the library staff oversaw the removal of the entire collection to the Copley Science building, converted the call numbers from Dewey Decimal to Library of Congress classification, and returned the collection to the renovated building. Eleanor was later part of the team which transferred information from printed catalog cards into the library’s first online catalog, MaconCat.

Eleanor was a Library Assistant in the Library from 1977-1994.  Below is the McGraw-Page library staff pictured in the 1985 Yellow Jacket Annual.

Three on the Third – April

Three on the Third is a monthly series in which we highlight three books new to the library collection.  Summaries of the books are provided along with shelf location and a link to the item in the catalog.  This month we are featuring several exciting new additions to our POP collection.

A Sucky Love Story
by Brittani Louise Taylor
Cover of the book A Sucky Love StoryWhat if falling in love meant almost losing everything? Where does a moderately popular internet star who never leaves her house look for potential suitors? Online. Tinder, Bumble, Match.com, OkCupid–I tried them all. My thirty-one-year-old self clicked and swiped her little heart out, leading to more dates than I could count, and more disappointment than I was prepared for. Maybe you can relate. Maybe you know all too well the perils of modern dating. But let’s say, eventually, you meet someone. You think to yourself, ‘Wow, they’re perfect! Take me off the market, put a ring on it, knock me up, the whole enchilada, because they are “the one.”‘ Let’s also say that they ‘feel the same way’ about you. Your life starts to make sense! All the pain, heartbreak, and frustration from past failed relationships was worth it. Slow clap. That’s how I felt about Milos. He was from Europe, a doctor, wealthy, athletic. He had an accent and a dog. Milos was textbook marriage material. For him it was ‘love at first sight,’ but for me, it was ‘anxiety on every date.’ Something was telling me to run–but for two years, the only running I did was straight into his arms. If only I would have listened. This isn’t a love story. It’s my story of survival.
POP PN1992.9236.T39 A3 2018
Catalog Link – A Sucky Love Story 

 

On the Come Up
by Angie Thomas
On the Come Up As the daughter of an underground hip hop legend who died right before he hit big, Bri wants to be one of the greatest rappers of all time– and has massive shoes to fill. She’s been labeled a hoodlum at school, and the fridge at home is empty after her mom loses her job. So Bri pours her anger and frustration into her first song, which goes viral — for all the wrong reasons. Portrayed by the media as a menace, Bri makes a choice– and becomes the very thing the public has made her out to be. The odds are stacked against her, and freedom of speech isn’t always free.
POP PS3620.H62463 O6 2019
Catalog Link – On the Come Up

Laws of Human Nature 
by Robert Greene
Cover of the book Laws of Human NatureRobert Greene’s bestselling 48 Laws of Power (1988) distilled ancient wisdom and philosophy into essential texts for seekers of power, understanding, and mastery. Now he turns to understanding people’s drives and motivations, even when they are unconscious of them themselves. We are social animals. Our very lives depend on our relationships with people. Knowing why people do what they do is the most important tool we can possess. Drawing from the ideas and examples of Pericles, Queen Elizabeth I, Martin Luther King Jr, and many others, Greene teaches us how to detach ourselves from our own emotions and master self-control, how to develop the empathy that leads to insight, how to look behind people’s masks, and how to resist conformity to develop your singular sense of purpose.
POP BF637.S4 G7384 2018
Catalog Link – Laws of Human Nature

Road Trip Reads – Why and How to Read over Spring Break

Randolph-Macon College is on Spring Break March 30-April 7, 2019!

A collage of images showing the road trip spring break exhibit in the library vestibule
Exhibit in the McGraw-Page Library vestibule, Spring Break 2019

Whether your Spring Break this year includes an exciting trip or you’re just just headed home, don’t leave campus without a good book.

Why should you read for fun?

  • Reading about exotic places allows you to travel even if your bank account won’t let you actually get there (yet).
  • Reading builds empathy for people, cultures, and places you don’t have much experience with.
  • In an age filled with texts, Snapchat, and a million other distractions, reading helps you concentrate for longer periods of time than you usually do.
  • Reading for fun helps you read academic texts better. And it helps you write better, too!

Haven’t read for fun in such a long time you don’t even know what you like any more? The easiest place to start is the McGraw-Page Library (of course!). Visit the tables near the Information Desk to see some of our new books, or visit the POP (Popular) Reading Area near the Library entrance to the 24/7 room. There you’ll find a good mix of fiction and non-fiction, and almost all titles are related to movies, bestseller lists, or current events.

Looking for Audiobooks for a long drive? Check out OverDrive or hoopla available through the Pamunkey Regional Library, located just a few blocks away in downtown Ashland across from The Caboose. R-MC students are able to get a library card and use these resources for free!

If you’d like to explore before heading to the Library to see what we have, check out this list of suggestions from Lifehack: 17 Ways to Find Good Books to Read.

Fairy Tale Beginnings in 3D

[This is a guest post from Visiting Instruction Librarian Gardner Treneman.]

Professor Valentine Balguerie’s French 273 – “Fairy Tale Beginnings” class was always about building imagery. Based on classic folk/fairy tales, the class was asked to read several and analyze the common elements found in them. Instead of the ten-page paper, Prof. Balguerie wanted her students to try something she thought would be more fun. This is where our conversation started.

I’d seen a project posted online from the artist Tom Burtonwood. He was looking at the newer wave of open source 3D printing – providing the ability for the masses to work in a new medium. His project website says,

Within this context of free cultural products I chose to publish Orihon the world’s first entirely 3D printable book. The subject matter for Orihon is derived from 3D scans made of sculptures and reliefs, found at the Art Institute of Chicago, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, the American Museum of Natural in New York and The Field Museum in Chicago.

This immediately drew my attention, and since his focus was the openness of this new platform, he provided the files on one of the internet’s largest 3D file sharing sites, Thingiverse. The idea was wonderful, but the technology as progressed quite far in the six years since he created his plates and hinges. So I took the modular plate and created a new hinge that harnessed the abilities of our Ulitmaker 3, namely the ability to print in two materials. This new hinge was able to flex like a standard paper book but still had the modular aspect. These were printed ahead of time since the students didn’t need to edit them.

3D printed book hinge with four printed strips

 

When it came time for the students’ work they were shown both Thingiverse and Sketchfab: two repositories of opensource 3D models. The idea was for them to display the themes found in the fairy tales through visual objects, placed in the book’s pages. We had a class period in the Library Lab where they started learning and working in the free modeling software Tinkercad. Over the next few weeks I received all the individual students’ work, and began printing them when they came in. Nine students with four pages a piece added up to a lot of hours on our two printers!

3D book and the book Notre Dame de Paris by Victor Hugo and a small round compact mirror
3D book showing themes from Notre Dame de Paris by Victor Hugo
3D book and the book Twilight with a small blond doll in a purple dress
3D book showing themes from Twilight

In the end every student had their own, custom book that covered their specific fairy tale. This project built on a short paper (written in French) that explained what the themes were, and how they connected to today’s world. Professor Balguerie called this a success and is now planning a project to have her class produce “classic” books: printed on paper, bound with thread. We at the McGraw-Page Library are really looking forward to helping with that!

The 3D books created in “Fairy Tale Beginnings” class have been on display in the McGraw-Page Library vestibule since mid-January.