Three on the Third – April

Three on the Third is a monthly series in which we highlight three books new to the library collection. Summaries of the books are provided along with shelf location and a link to the item in the catalog.  For the month of April, we’re sharing a variety of new items to our collection.

Walter Ralegh: Architect of Empire
by Alan Gallay
Cover of the book Walter Ralegh - Architect of Empire.
Sir Walter Ralegh was a favorite of Queen Elizabeth. She showered him with estates and political appointments. He envisioned her becoming empress of a universal empire. She gave him the opportunity to lead the way. In Walter Ralegh, Alan Gallay shows that, while Ralegh may be best known for founding the failed Roanoke colony, his historical importance vastly exceeds that enterprise. Inspired by the mystical religious philosophy of hermeticism, Ralegh led English attempts to colonize in North America, South America, and Ireland. He believed that the answer to English fears of national decline resided overseas — and that colonialism could be achieved without conquest. Gallay reveals how Ralegh launched the English Empire and an era of colonization that shaped Western history for centuries after his death.
Catalog Link – Walter Ralegh
Shelf Location: DA 86.22 .R2 G35 2019

Anatomy of Foolishness
by Stephen Greenspan
Cover of the book Anatomy of Foolishness.
Just days after publishing his first book on the theory of foolishness, Stephen Greenspan learned that he had been hoodwinked by Bernard Madoff’s Ponzi scheme, or more accurately the Madoff “feeder” fund he invested in. Greenspan published a featured essay on the topic in the Wall Street Journal a few weeks later, and that essay was widely cited and attracted great interest for Greenspan’s ideas about gullibility and in the United States and many other countries. Greenspan’s new book, The Anatomy of Foolishness, explains why and how individuals (of all ages and levels of intelligence) and organizations act in ways that undermine their interests and even their continued existence. He examines three types of foolishness, using vivid examples to illustrate each, including the many foolish actions of US President Donald Trump. Greenspan presents a multidimensional theory of foolishness that contributes to the literature on human competence, and this book is likely to attract broad interest in the fields of psychology, sociology, economics, political science, and psychiatry as well as among those members of the general public (basically everyone) who have acted foolishly or know someone who has acted in a way that went against their own interests.
Catalog Link – Anatomy of Foolishness
Shelf Location: BF 431 .G7823 2019

 

The Infinite Game
by Simon Sinek
Cover of the book Infinite Game.Infinite games, like football or chess, the players are known, the rules are fixed, and the endpoint is clear. The winners and losers are easily identified. In infinite games, like business or politics or life itself, the players come and go, the rules are changeable, and there is no defined endpoint. There are no winners or losers in an infinite game; there is only ahead and behind. The more I started to understand the difference between finite and infinite games, the more I began to see infinite games all around us. I started to see that many of the struggles that organizations face exist simply because their leaders were playing with a finite mindset in an infinite game. These organizations tend to lag behind in innovation, discretionary effort, morale and ultimately performance. The leaders who embrace an infinite mindset, in stark contrast, build stronger, more innovative, more inspiring organizations. Their people trust each other and their leaders. They have the resilience to thrive in an ever-changing world, while their competitors fall by the wayside. Ultimately, they are the ones who lead the rest of us into the future. Any worthwhile undertaking starts with Why — the purpose, cause or belief that inspires us to do what we do and inspires others to join us. Good leaders know how to build Circles of Safety that promote trust and cooperation throughout their organizations. But that’s not enough to help us chart a course through the unpredictable, often chaotic landscape of today’s marketplace. I now believe that the ability to adopt an infinite mindset is a prerequisite for any leader who aspires to leave their organization in better shape than they found it.
Catalog Link – The Infinite Game

Shelf Location: HD 57.7 .S54866 2019

Three on the Third – March 2020

Three on the Third is a monthly series in which we highlight three books new to the library collection. Summaries of the books are provided along with shelf location and a link to the item in the catalog.  For the month of March, we’re sharing a variety of new items to our collection.

Good Sport
by Thomas H. Murray
Cover of the book Good Sport.
Why are some technologies such as fiberglass vaulting poles and hinged skates accepted in sport while performance-enhancing drugs are forbidden? Yes, performance-enhancing drugs are against the rules, but the people who play and govern sport create those rules; rules can be changed. Should we level the playing field by allowing all competitors to use drugs that allow them to run faster or longer, leap higher, or lift more? In this provocative exploration of what draws us to sport as participants and spectators, Good Sport argues that the values and meanings embedded within our games provide the guidance we need to make difficult decisions about fairness and performance-enhancing technologies. Good Sport reveals what we care about in sport. It describes how the reckless use of biomedical enhancements undermines those values. Implicit in sport’s history, rules and practices are values and meanings that provide a sturdy foundation for an ethics of sport that celebrates natural talents and dedication. The way a sport adapts to innovations in equipment, tactics and players makes visible its values and meanings. Performance-enhancing drugs distort the connection between natural talents, the dedication to perfect those talents, and success in sport. Through understanding the fundamental role of values and meanings, we can see not just what we champion in the athletic arena but more broadly what we value in human achievement.
Shelf Location: RC1230 .M87 2018
Catalog Link – Good Sport

 

Damnation Island: Poor, Sick, Mad & Criminal in 19th Century New York 
by Stacy Horn
Cover of the book Damnation Island.Conceived as the most modern, humane incarceration facility the world had ever seen, New York’s Blackwell’s Island, site of a lunatic asylum, two prisons, an almshouse, and a number of hospitals, quickly became, in the words of a visiting Charles Dickens, “a lounging, listless madhouse.” Digging through city records, newspaper articles, and archival reports, Stacy Horn tells a gripping narrative through the voices of the island’s inhabitants. We also hear from the era’s officials, reformers, and journalists, including the celebrated undercover reporter Nellie Bly. And we follow the extraordinary Reverend William Glenney French as he ministers to Blackwell’s residents, battles the bureaucratic mazes of the Department of Correction and a corrupt City Hall, testifies at salacious trials, and in his diary wonders about man’s inhumanity to his fellow man. Damnation Island shows how far we’ve come in caring for the least fortunate among us—and reminds us how much work still remains.
Shelf Location: RC 445 .N68 H67 2018
Catalog Link: Damnation Island

 

Where Good Ideas Come From
by Steve Johnson
Cover of the book Where Good Ideas Come From.The printing press, the pencil, the flush toilet, the battery–these are all great ideas. But where do they come from? What kind of environment breeds them? What sparks the flash of brilliance? How do we generate the breakthrough technologies that push forward our lives, our society, our culture? Steven Johnson’s answers are revelatory as he identifies the seven key patterns behind genuine innovation, and traces them across time and disciplines. From Darwin and Freud to the halls of Google and Apple, Johnson investigates the innovation hubs throughout modern time and pulls out the approaches and commonalities that seem to appear at moments of originality.
Shelf Location: BF 408 .J56 2010
Catalog Link: Where Good Ideas Come From

Coretta Scott King Award – Read Aloud Books

Doing a classroom read-aloud this month?
Look no further!  This month, we’re spotlighting 4 amazing books that have won the Coretta Scott King Book Award, and will work perfectly in a variety of classrooms, just in time for Black History Month.

The Coretta Scott King Book Award is given annually by the American Library Association.  According the the ALA, The Coretta Scott King Book Awards are given annually to outstanding African American authors and illustrators of books for children and young adults that demonstrate an appreciation of African American culture and universal human values.  The award commemorates the life and work of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., and honors his wife, Mrs. Coretta Scott King, for her courage and determination to continue the work for peace and world brotherhood.

Below, you’ll find the book title, author, illustrator, a brief description, catalog link and location of each book.  All books are currently available to check-out at the McGraw-Page Library and are displayed (with many others) on the first display table by the Circulation Desk.

Radiant Child 
by Javaka Steptoe (author/illustrator)
Cover of the Book Radiant Child2017 Coretta Scott King Illustrator Award Winner
Jean-Michel Basquiat and his unique, collage-style paintings rocketed to fame in the 1980s as a cultural phenomenon unlike anything the art world had ever seen. But before that, he was a little boy who saw art everywhere: in poetry books and museums, in games and in the words that we speak, and in the pulsing energy of New York City. Now, award-winning illustrator Javaka Steptoe’s vivid text and bold artwork echoing Basquiat’s own introduce young readers to the powerful message that art doesn’t always have to be neat or clean–and definitely not inside the lines–to be beautiful.
JUV BIO BAS (On display – February 2020)
Catalog Link – Radiant Child  

 

Little Melba and Her Big Trombone 
by Katheryn Russell-Brown
Illustrated by Frank Morrison
Cover of the book Little Melba and Her Big Trombone2015 Coretta Scott King Illustrator Honor Book
Melba Doretta Liston loved the sounds of music from as far back as she could remember. As a child, she daydreamed about beats and lyrics, and hummed along with the music from her family s Majestic radio. At age seven, Melba fell in love with a big, shiny trombone, and soon taught herself to play the instrument. By the time she was a teenager, Melba s extraordinary gift for music led her to the world of jazz. She joined a band led by trumpet player Gerald Wilson and toured the country. Overcoming obstacles of race and gender, Melba went on to become a famed trombone player and arranger, spinning rhythms, harmonies, and melodies into gorgeous songs for all the jazz greats of the twentieth century: Randy Weston, Duke Ellington, Count Basie, Billie Holiday, and Quincy Jones, to name just a few. Brimming with ebullience and the joy of making music, Little Melba and Her Big Trombone is a fitting tribute to a trailblazing musician and a great unsung hero of jazz.
BIO LIS (On display – February 2020)
Catalog Link – Little Melba and Her Big Trombone

 

Out of Wonder
by Kwame Alexander, Chris Colderley, and Marjory Wentworth
Illustrated by Ekua Holmes
Cover of the book Out of Wonder2018 Coretta Scott King Illustrator Award Winner
Presents a collection of 20 poems written in tribute to well-known poets from around the world.  Newbery Medalist and a Caldecott Honoree offer a glorious, lyrical ode to poets who have sparked a sense of wonder. Out of gratitude for the poet’s art form, Newbery Award-winning author and poet Kwame Alexander, along with Chris Colderley and Marjory Wentworth, present original poems that pay homage to twenty famed poets who have made the authors’ hearts sing and their minds wonder. Stunning mixed-media images by Ekua Holmes, winner of a Caldecott Honor and a John Steptoe New Talent Illustrator Award, complete the celebration and invite the reader to listen, wonder, and perhaps even pick up a pen.
JUV 808.1 ALE (On display – February 2020)
Catalog Link – Out of Wonder

 

Minty
by Alan Schroeder
Illustrated by Jerry Pinkney
Cover of the book Minty.1997 Coretta Scott King Illustrator Award Winner
They called her “Minty.”
When she grew up, she became Harriet Tubman, the courageous and heroic woman who helped hundreds of slaves escape to freedom through the Underground Railroad. But she was just a little girl for a while—and this is her story. Minty, short for Araminta, was a feisty and headstrong young slave, whose rebellious spirit often got her into trouble. She told stories to her doll, released animals from traps, and, above all, dreamed of running away. And when her father began to teach her the skills necessary for escape, she listened carefully, and learned.
BIO TUB (On display – February 2020)
Catalog Link – Minty

Have you used any of these in a classroom yet?
Are there other Coretta Scott King Award Winners you’ve used and love?
Let us know in the comments below!!

Three on the Third – February 2020

Three on the Third is a monthly series in which we highlight three books new to the library collection. Summaries of the books are provided along with shelf location and a link to the item in the catalog.  For the month of February, we’re sharing some fresh items to our Popular Reading Collection.

Talking to Strangers
by Malcolm Gladwell
Cover of the book, Talking to Strangers.In this thoughtful treatise spurred by the 2015 death of African-American academic Sandra Bland in jail after a traffic stop, New Yorker writer Gladwell (The Tipping Point) aims to figure out the strategies people use to assess strangers-to “analyze, critique them, figure out where they came from, figure out how to fix them,” in other words: to understand how to balance trust and safety. He uses a variety of examples from history and recent headlines to illustrate that people size up the motivations, emotions, and trustworthiness of those they don’t know both wrongly and with misplaced confidence.
POP HM 1111 .G53 2019
Catalog Link – Talking to Strangers

 

Permanent Record
by Edward Snowden
Cover of the book Permanent Record.In 2013, twenty-nine-year-old Edward Snowden shocked the world when he broke with the American intelligence establishment and revealed that the United States government was secretly pursuing the means to collect every single phone call, text message, and email. The result would be an unprecedented system of mass surveillance with the ability to pry into the private lives of every person on earth. Six years later, Snowden reveals how he helped to build this system and why he was moved to expose it. Spanning the bucolic Beltway suburbs of his childhood and the clandestine CIA and NSA postings of his adulthood, Permanent Record is the account of a bright young man who grew up online — a man who became a spy, a whistleblower, and, in exile, the Internet’s conscience.
POP CT 275 .S6693 A3 2019
Catalog Link – Permanent Record

 

The Five
by Hallie Rubenhold
Cover of the book the Five.The untold story of the women killed by Jack the Ripper–and a gripping portrait of Victorian London–[this book] changes the narrative of these murders forever. Polly, Annie, Elisabeth, Catherine, and Mary Jane are famous for the same thing, though they never met. They came from some of London’s wealthiest and poorest neighborhoods, from the factory towns of middle England, and from Wales and Sweden. They wrote ballads, ran coffeehouses, lived on country estates; they breathed ink dust from printing presses and escaped human traffickers. What they had in common was the year of their murders: 1888. The person responsible was never identified, but the character created by the press to fill that gap has become far more famous than any of these five women. For more than a century newspapers have been keen to tell us that ‘the Ripper’ preyed on prostitutes. Not only is this untrue, as historian Hallie Rubenhold has discovered, but it has prevented the real stories of these fascinating women from being told. Now, by drawing on a wealth of formerly unseen archival material and adding full historical context to the victims’ lives, Rubenhold finally sets the record straight, revealing a world not just of Dickens and Queen Victoria, but of poverty, homelessness, and rampant misogyny. They died because they were in the wrong place at the wrong time–but their greatest misfortune was to be born women.
POP HV 6535 .G6 L6578 2019
Catalog Link – The Five

Three on the Third – January 2020

Three on the Third is a monthly series in which we highlight three books new to the library collection. Summaries of the books are provided along with shelf location and a link to the item in the catalog.  It’s a new year, and to celebrate, we have three books that will give you things to ponder for 2020.

Conscience: the Origins of Moral Intuition
by Patricia S. Churchland
Cover of the book Conscience.In her brilliant work Touching a Nerve, Patricia S. Churchland, the distinguished founder of neurophilosophy, drew from scientific research on the brain to understand its philosophical and ethical implications for identity, consciousness, free will, and memory. In Conscience, she explores how moral systems arise from our physical selves in combination with environmental demands.  All social groups have ideals for behavior, even though ethics vary among different cultures and among individuals within each culture. In trying to understand why, Churchland brings together an understanding of the influences of nature and nurture. She looks to evolution to elucidate how, from birth, our brains are configured to form bonds, to cooperate, and to care. She shows how children grow up in society to learn, through repetition and rewards, the norms, values, and behavior that their parents embrace.  Conscience delves into scientific studies, particularly the fascinating work on twins, to deepen our understanding of whether people have a predisposition to embrace specific ethical stands. Research on psychopaths illuminates the knowledge about those who abide by no moral system and the explanations science gives for these disturbing individuals.  Churchland then turns to philosophy―that of Socrates, Aquinas, and contemporary thinkers like Owen Flanagan―to explore why morality is central to all societies, how it is transmitted through the generations, and why different cultures live by different morals. Her unparalleled ability to join ideas rarely put into dialogue brings light to a subject that speaks to the meaning of being human.
BJ 1471 .C475 2019
Catalog Link – Conscience

 

What if I Say the Wrong Thing?
by Verna A. Myers
Cover of the book What if I Say the Wrong Thing?In this compelling new tip book you’ll find innovative and surprising ways to keep your personal diversity journey moving and the diversity commitment of your organization. Written to make this information bite-size and accessible, you’ll find quick answers to typical What should I do? questions, like: What if I say the wrong thing, what should I do? What if I am work and someone makes a sexist joke, what should I say?
KF 300 .M94 2013
Catalog Link  – What if I Say the Wrong Thing?

 

The Way We Eat Now
by Bee Wilson
Cover of the book The Way We Eat Now.In just two generations, the world has undergone a massive shift from traditional, limited diets to more globalized ways of eating– from bubble tea to quinoa, Soylent to meal kits. Paradoxically, our diets are getting healthier and less healthy at the same time. For some, there has never been a happier food era than today: a time of unusual herbs, farmers’ markets, and internet recipe swaps. Yet modern food also kills– diabetes and heart disease are on the rise everywhere on earth. This is a book about the good, the terrible, and the avocado toast. A riveting exploration of the hidden forces behind what we eat, “The way we eat now” explains how this food revolution has transformed our bodies, our social lives, and the world we live in.
TX 631 .W5484 2019
Catalog Link – The Way We Eat Now  

Three on the Third – December 2019

Three on the Third is a monthly series in which we highlight three books new to the library collection. Summaries of the books are provided along with shelf location and a link to the item in the catalog.  This month we have three new additions to our POP collection.

The Miseducation of Cameron Post 
by Emily Danforth
Cover of the novel The Miseducation of Cameron Post.
When Cameron Post’s parents die suddenly in a car crash, her shocking first thought is relief. Relief they’ll never know that, hours earlier, she had been kissing a girl.  But that relief doesn’t last, and Cam is forced to move in with her conservative aunt Ruth and her well-intentioned but hopelessly old-fashioned grandmother. She knows that from this point on, her life will forever be different. Survival in Miles City, Montana, means blending in and leaving well enough alone, and Cam becomes an expert at both.  Then Coley Taylor moves to town. Beautiful, pickup-driving Coley is a perfect cowgirl with the perfect boyfriend to match. She and Cam forge an unexpected and intense friendship, one that seems to leave room for something more to emerge. But just as that starts to seem like a real possibility, Aunt Ruth takes drastic action to “fix” her niece, bringing Cam face-to-face with the cost of denying her true self—even if she’s not quite sure who that is.
POP PS 3604 .A64 M5 2012
Catalog Link – The Miseducation of Cameron Post 

 

Stumptown 
by Greg Rucka
Cover of the graphic novel Stumptown.
Dex is the proprietor of Stumptown Investigations, and a fairly talented P.I. Unfortunately, she’s less adept at throwing dice than solving cases. Her recent streak has left her beyond broke – she’s into the Confederated Tribes of the Wind Coast for 18 large. But maybe Dex’s luck is about to change. Sue-Lynne, head of the Wind Coast’s casino operation, will clear Dex’s debt if she can locate Sue-Lynne’s missing granddaughter. But is this job Dex’s way out of the hole or a shove down one much much deeper?
POP PN 6727.R825 S85 2013
Catalog Link – Stumptown

 

Slay 
by Brittney Morris
Cover of the book Slay. Kiera Johnson is an honors student, a math tutor, and one of the few Black kids at Jefferson Academy. At home she joins hundreds of thousands of Black gamers who duel worldwide as Nubian personas in the secret multiplayer online role-playing card game, SLAY. When a teen in Kansas City is murdered over a dispute in the SLAY world, the game is labeled a racist, exclusionist, violent hub for thugs and criminals. No one knows Kiera is the game developer– until an anonymous troll infiltrates the game, threatening to sue Kiera for “anti-white discrimination.” Can she protect her game without losing herself in the process?
POP PS 3613 .O77 S5 2019
Catalog Link – Slay 

Four on the Fourth – November 2019

Three on the Third is a monthly series in which we highlight three books new to the library collection. Summaries of the books are provided along with shelf location and a link to the item in the catalog.  This month we’re modifying it slightly to spotlight four exciting new additions across a variety of subject areas.

United States v. Apple Competition in America
by Chris Sagers
Cover of the book United States v. Apple
One of the most followed antitrust cases of recent times–United States v. Apple–reveals a missed truth: what Americans most fear is competition itself. In 2012 the Department of Justice accused Apple and five book publishers of conspiring to fix e-book prices. The evidence overwhelmingly showed an unadorned price-fixing conspiracy that cost consumers hundreds of millions of dollars. Yet before, during, and after the trial millions of Americans sided with the defendants. Pundits on the left and right condemned the government for its decision to sue, decrying Amazon’s market share, railing against a new high-tech economy, and rallying to defend beloved authors and publishers. For many, Amazon was the one that should have been put on trial. But why? One fact went unrecognized and unreckoned with: in practice, Americans have long been ambivalent about competition. Chris Sagers, a renowned antitrust expert, meticulously pulls apart the misunderstandings and exaggerations that industries as diverse as mom-and-pop grocers and producers of cast-iron sewer pipes have cited to justify colluding to forestall competition.
KF 1627 .S242 2019
Catalog Link – United States v. Apple

 

Hive Mind
by Sarah Rose Cavanagh
Cover of the book Hive MindHivemind: A collective consciousness in which we share consensus thoughts, emotions, and opinions; a phenomenon whereby a group of people function as if with a single mind. Our views of the world are shaped by the stories told by our self-selected communities. Whether seeking out groups that share our tastes, our faith, our heritage, or other interests, since the dawn of time we have taken comfort in defining ourselves through our social groups. But what happens when we only socialize with our chosen group, to the point that we lose the ability to connect to people who don’t share our passions? What happens when our tribes merely confirm our world view, rather than expand it? The advent of social media and smartphones has amplified these tendencies in ways that spell both promise and peril. Our hive-ish natures benefit us in countless ways–combating the mental and physical costs of loneliness, connecting us with collaborators and supporters, and exposing us to entertainment and information beyond what we can find in our literal backyards. But of course, there are also looming risks–echo chambers, political polarization, and conspiracy theories that have already begun to have deadly consequences. Leading a narrative journey from the site of the Charlottesville riots to the boardrooms of Facebook, considering such diverse topics as zombies, neuroscience, and honeybees, psychologist and emotion regulation specialist Sarah Rose Cavanagh leaves no stone unturned in her quest to understand how social technology is reshaping the way we socialize. It’s not possible to turn back the clocks, and Cavanagh argues that there’s no need to; instead, she presents a fully examined and thoughtful call to cut through our online tribalism, dial back our moral panic about screens and mental health, and shore up our sense of community.
HM 866 .C38 2019
Catalog Link – Hive Mind


Pain Killer
An Empire of Deceit and the Origin of America’s Opioid Epidemic

by Barry Meier
Cover of the book Pain Killer.Between 1999 and 2017, an estimated 250,000 Americans died from overdoses involving prescription painkillers, a plague ignited by the aggressive marketing of OxyContin by its maker, Purdue Pharma. Purdue, owned by a wealthy and secretive family–the Sacklers–knew early on that teenagers and others were abusing its billion dollar “wonder” drug. But Justice Department officials balked a decade ago when it came to meting out justice, allowing an opioid crisis to evolve into a catastrophe. Originally published in 2003 and hailed since as groundbreaking, Meier–in this thoroughly updated edition–reveals new and shocking information about how long the drug maker knew about OxyContin’s abuse, even as it marketed it aggressively, and the way government officials passed up opportunities to protect hundreds of thousands of lives. Equal parts crime thriller, medical detective story, and business expos, ̌ Pain Killer is the origin story of the opioid crisis, a hard-hitting look at how a supposed wonder drug became the gateway drug to a national tragedy.
HV 5822 .O99 M45 2018
Catalog Link – Pain Killer 


The Memory Police 

by Yoko Ogawa
Cover of the book The Memory Police.On an unnamed island off an unnamed coast, objects are disappearing: first hats, then ribbons, birds, roses–until things become much more serious. Most of the island’s inhabitants are oblivious to these changes, while those few imbued with the power to recall the lost objects live in fear of the draconian Memory Police, who are committed to ensuring that what has disappeared remains forgotten. When a young woman who is struggling to maintain her career as a novelist discovers that her editor is in danger from the Memory Police, she concocts a plan to hide him beneath her floorboards. As fear and loss close in around them, they cling to her writing as the last way of preserving the past. A surreal, provocative fable about the power of memory and the trauma of loss, The Memory Police is a stunning new work from one of the most exciting contemporary authors writing in any language.
PL 858 .G37 H5713 2019
Catalog Link – The Memory Police 

From Special Collections and Archives: Fundraising at R-MC: The Hezekiah Leigh Medal

front of medal depicting profile of REv. Hezeiah G. Leigh
Front of H. G. Leigh Medal
Back of H.G. Leigh medal depicitng main building of Randolph-Macon College in Boydton
Back of H. G. Leigh Medal

The Rev. Hezekiah G. Leigh medal shown here, with Reverend Hezekiah G. Leigh on one side and the main building of Randolph-Macon College in Boydton on the reverse side, was produced in 1867 by the College and distributed by the Richmond Christian Advocate, the Methodist newspaper in Virginia, as a means to raise funds for the repair of Randolph-Macon College after the Civil War. Contributors to the fund would receive a medal of Rev. Leigh, Bishop Joshua Soule, or both, depending on the amount of their gift. During this era, memorabilia with images of respected individuals was popular appearing as prints, statues and busts, plates, medals, and other items.

Advertisements for the medals appeared in several publications. The February, 1868 issue of the Southern Planter and Farmer magazine included this one:

“Beautiful Medallion Likenesses of Bishop Soule and Rev. Hezekiah
G. Leigh, D. D.

We are indebted to the courtesy of the President of Randolph Macon College for the above named Medals. These eminent men of God, whose names adorn the annals of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, and whose distinguished faithful and efficient labors in the gospel have enshrined their blessed memories as “holy relics” in the hearts of all true Methodists, are most beautifully and artistically expressed in bas-relief likenesses of admirable truthfulness on metalic disks of bright untarnished lustre. These souvenirs are offered to those who contribute to the fund being raised for the repairs of Randolph Macon College, upon the following terms:

A contribution of $2 entitles the donor to the likeness of the Bishop.
A contribution of $1 to that of Dr. Leigh, the founder of the College.
And for three dollars both will be given to the contributor.
Address Rev. S. T. Moorman, care of the Richmond Christian Advocate.”

Unfortunately, funds were still tight in post-war Virginia and very little money was raised this way, so the repairs were never made to the College’s main building in Boydton. The College had closed in 1862 for the duration of the war and although there was no military activity in Mecklenburg County, the College’s main building was occupied for four months by the Union Army at the end of the war and sustained damage, although we have no documentation of the nature and extent of that damage.  The College moved to Ashland in 1868 instead, selling the property in Boydton.

To see this item or other materials pertaining to the history of Randolph-Macon College, contact us at archives@rmc.edu.

From Special Collections and Archives: The Fish Cap

Although freshmen are generally known as “rats” at most colleges, Freshmen at R-MC have been called “fish” since at least the 1890s. Although we do not know the exact origin or first use of “fish” to refer to freshmen, the first Yellow Jacket yearbook in 1899 refers to “big fish, little fish and a few minnows.”  One legend surrounding this says that the appearance of our freshmen on campus often coincided with major rainstorms from hurricanes and tropical storms that led to major flooding on campus, hence the name “fish.” The campus and the streets surrounding it were prone to significant flooding before major work on drainage was done, and photos in the College archives from the 1960s show students rowing down Henry Street.

Photo of Freshman RMC beanie, 1940s
RMC fish cap, 1940s

The “fish cap” or freshman beanie, such as the one shown here, was required to be worn publicly by all freshmen during the Fall semester to distinguish them from returning students. Upperclassmen would make freshmen carry their books, drop and do pushups on command, and many other activities now banned as hazing. The freshmen had one hope: if the R-MC football team beat Hampden-Sydney, freshmen could remove the beanie early saving themselves from several more weeks of hazing.

To learn more about this tradition, contact us at archives@rmc.edu

Three on the Third – October 2019

Three on the Third is a monthly series in which we highlight three books new to the library collection.  Summaries of the books are provided along with shelf location and a link to the item in the catalog.  This month we’re spotlighting some exciting new additions to our POP collection.

Stay Sexy, Don’t Get Murdered 
by Karen Kilgariff and Georgia Hardstark
Cover of the book Stay Sexy and Don't Get Murdered.
The highly anticipated first book by Karen Kilgariff and Georgia Hardstark, the voices behind the #1 hit podcast My Favorite Murder! Sharing never-before-heard stories ranging from their struggles with depression, eating disorders, and addiction, Karen and Georgia irreverently recount their biggest mistakes and deepest fears, reflecting on the formative life events that shaped them into two of the most followed voices in the nation.  In Stay Sexy & Don’t Get Murdered, Karen and Georgia focus on the importance of self-advocating and valuing personal safety over being ‘nice’ or ‘helpful.’ They delve into their own pasts, true crime stories, and beyond to discuss meaningful cultural and societal issues with fierce empathy and unapologetic frankness.
POP HQ 1413 .K55 A3 2019
Catalog Link – Stay Sexy, Don’t Get Murdered


The Sixth Man: Andre Iguodala
by Andre Iguodala
Cover of the book The Sixth Man.The standout memoir from NBA powerhouse Andre Iguodala, the indomitable sixth man of the champion Golden State Warriors. Andre Iguodala is one of the most admired players in the NBA. And fresh off the Warriors’ third NBA championship in the last four years, his game has never been stronger. Off the court, Iguodala has earned respect, too–for his successful tech investments, his philanthropy, and increasingly for his contributions to the conversation about race in America. It is no surprise, then, that in his first book, Andre–with his cowriter Carvell Wallace–has pushed himself to go further than he ever has before about his life, not only as an athlete but about what makes him who he is at his core. The Sixth Man traces Andre’s journey from childhood in his Illinois hometown to his Bay Area home court today. Basketball has always been there. But this is the story, too, of his experience of the conflict and racial tension always at hand in a professional league made up largely of African American men; of whether and why the athlete owes the total sacrifice of his body; of the relationship between competition and brotherhood among the players of one of history’s most glorious championship teams. And of what motivates an athlete to keep striving for more once they’ve already achieved the highest level of play they could have dreamed. On drive, on leadership, on pain, on accomplishment, on the shame of being given a role, and the glory of taking a role on: This is a powerful memoir of life and basketball that reveals new depths to the superstar athlete, and offers tremendous insight into most urgent stories being told in American society today.
POP GV 884 .I76 A3 2019
Catalog Link – The Sixth Man

 

Midnight in Chernobyl
by Adam Higginbotham
Cover of the book Midnight in Chernobyl. Early in the morning of April 26, 1986, Reactor Number Four of the Chernobyl Atomic Energy Station exploded, triggering history’s worst nuclear disaster. In the thirty years since then, Chernobyl has become lodged in the collective nightmares of the world: shorthand for the spectral horrors of radiation poisoning, for a dangerous technology slipping its leash, for ecological fragility, and for what can happen when a dishonest and careless state endangers its citizens and the entire world. But the real story of the accident, clouded from the beginning by secrecy, propaganda, and misinformation, has long remained in dispute.  Drawing on hundreds of hours of interviews conducted over the course of more than ten years, as well as letters, unpublished memoirs, and documents from recently-declassified archives, Adam Higginbotham has written a harrowing and compelling narrative which brings the disaster to life through the eyes of the men and women who witnessed it firsthand. The result is a masterful nonfiction thriller, and the definitive account of an event that changed history: a story that is more complex, more human, and more terrifying than the Soviet myth.  Midnight in Chernobyl is an indelible portrait of one of the great disasters of the twentieth century, of human resilience and ingenuity, and the lessons learned when mankind seeks to bend the natural world to his will—lessons which, in the face of climate change and other threats, remain not just vital but necessary.
POP TK 1362 .U38 H54 2019
Catalog Link – Midnight in Chernobyl