HeinOnline Government, Politics, and Law

New this year is HeinOnline Government, Politics, and Law, a database containing over 100 million pages of fully searchable content from more than 156,000 titles and 310,000 volumes. Covering both contemporary and historic information with full text and original page images, this is our new go-to database for legal and government information, replacing much of the legal content formerly found in LexisNexis Academic to which we no longer subscribe. Included are a law journal database of over 3000 full text publications, all volumes of the Congressional Record, complete coverage of federal laws and legislation, all United States Treaties, constitutions for every country in the world, classic books from the 18th & 19th centuries, and more! Full text of state and federal case law powered by Fastcase is included.

The entire database can be searched or you may browse by subject areas or choose among several smaller databases including:

Brennan Center for Justice Publications from NYU School of Law
Criminal Justice in America: U.S. Attorney General Opinions, Reports, and Publications
Gun Regulation and Legislation in America
Federal Register/Code of Federal Regulations
Foreign Relations of the United States
History of International Law
Law Journal Library
Legal Classics
John F. Kennedy Assassination Collection
Pentagon Papers
Religion and the Law
U.S. Attorney General Opinions, Reports, and Publications
U.S. Code
U.S. Congressional Documents
U.S. Federal Legislative
U.S. Presidential Library
U.S. Statutes at Large
U.S. Supreme Court Library
Women and the Law
World Constitutions Illustrated
Treaties and Agreements

Users can create MyHein accounts to customize their experience. When logged in, you can bookmark articles, create notes, save search queries,  set up alerts to be informed of newly published materials, and more.

If you have any questions about HeinOnline, please contact your subject librarian

What’s New @ the McGraw-Page Library–Fall 2018 Edition

There have been some changes to the library and its resources this summer! Read below to learn what’s new and how it may impact you.

What’s New?

  • The new library website is now live! The new website makes navigation easier so that library information and resources are easier to fine.
  • The library’s DVD collection has been relocated to the shelves next to and behind the current journals. This has allowed us to remove a tall shelf on the main level of the library, making it feel more open.

Canvas & Folio Workshops

  • Canvas and Folio workshops will be happening through August 28, and additional Instructional Design & Technology workshops for students and faculty will be offered throughout the fall. View the schedule of workshops.

Course Reserves

  • Physical materials: Books (library or personal copies), DVDs, and other physical items can be put on reserve at the Library Information Desk. Faculty should allow at least 48 hours for course materials to be put on reserve. View guidelines for placing materials on reserve, or contact Luke Haushalter with questions at (804) 752-7302 or LukeHaushalter@rmc.edu.
  • Digital materials: Articles and streaming videos that are available in Kanopy or other databases can be posted directly in Canvas. Save time using these guidelines for Creating Persistent Links so that students can access these resources off-campus. Questions about persistent links? Contact Nancy Falciani-White at (804) 752-7256 or NancyFalcianiWhite@rmc.edu. Questions about Canvas? Contact Lily Zhang at 752-3216 or zzhang@rmc.edu.

Research Instruction

  • Librarians are available to provide research instruction in R-MC classes. You can bring your class to the library, or we can come to the regular classroom. Librarians can help students learn how to search relevant research databases effectively, construct research questions, evaluate sources, and think about information from an academic perspective. Contact your subject librarian to learn more.
  • The subject guides that the library has created continue to be linked in Canvas courses under the “Library Resources” navigation. If you’d like to recommend changes to your guide, contact your subject librarian.

Review your Library Account

  • Now is a great time to review what you have checked out from the library and renew or return items. View and renew your checked out items via MaconCat, or contact Information Desk staff. 

New Resources

We have added several exciting new collections since the spring. All are available through the Databases tab on the new website, and are available to current R-MC students, staff, and faculty.

  • Access World News provides access to news from around the world. This database replaces the news content previously found in LexisNexis and America’s News.
  • Atlantic Monthly Archive
  • HeinOnline Government, Politics, & Law is the world’s largest fully searchable, image-based government document and legal research database.
  • Nation Magazine Archive
  • National Review Archive
  • New Republic Archive
  • Oxford Art Online: Contains Grove Dictionary of Art and Benezit Dictionary of Artists
  • Richmond Times-Dispatch Archive
  • U.S. News & World Report Archive
  • Vanderbilt Television News Archive

As always, your comments or questions are welcome. Please send them to library@rmc.edu or contact your R-MC Subject Librarian.

From Special Collections and Archives: 1859 Graduation Program

Among the memorabilia in the College Archives are numerous graduation programs, films, speeches and other items showcasing this very special day of celebration.

One of the most interesting of these is a graduation program belonging to Leroy Summerfield Edwards, Class of 1859. Graduation at that time was a multi-day event, and each student was required to make a lengthy speech; Leroy’s speech, Literary Dietetics, is also available in the College Archives. The jubilation of their college graduation ceremony and the hopeful futures the students in the Class of 1859 expected during those June days of 1859 would later be squelched by the Civil War. Leroy annotated his program indicating the tragic wartime fates of several of his classmates. Of the 19 graduates listed, 4 are labeled “killed” and 2 labeled “dead” and “died.” Those listed as killed died from battle wounds, while the two listed as dead and died were Leroy’s closest friends, who died a year apart of disease. An additional graduate has “lost right arm at Strasburg” next to his name. Leroy himself would be wounded, recover and go back to the war, be captured and spend nearly a year in two prison camps, including the famous Elmira, NY camp know as “Helmira.” He was paroled and returned to Virginia in time to flee Richmond with the Confederate army and surrender at Appomattox Courthouse.

The survivors of the Class of 1859 would become educators, ministers, lawyers, judges, legislators, and even college presidents, including Dr. William G. Starr, the 9th president of R-MC (1899-1902).

1859 graduation program page 1

1859 graduation prgram page 2

1859 graduation program page 3

 

 

 

Infographics and Course Assignments

Infographics combines “information” and “graphics”; it allows using visual presentations to communicate simple or sophisticated concepts. TIMES magazine – based on the Pew Research Center data – has created this infographics to illustrate “Is College Worth it?”.  The design and use of text, images, colors and layout make the data-intensive presentation straightforward for public audience.

Infographic assignments offer an alternative to traditional writing assignments, and are gradually gaining attention in higher education.  Online Infographic tools provide hundreds of templates and theme categories, removing technology and design barriers for students. Students can focus on content and data selection in communicating concepts and viewpoints (EDUCAUSE, 2013).  This blog, hosted by College of William & Mary, details why and how to design such assignments.

At R-MC, we have obtained trial licenses for the tool Venngage. Currently two faculty members are testing to integrate it into courses. A future Library blog will share their experiences.  The free version requires creating user account and gives access to many design templates. It does not allow final work to be saved as PDF.

 

 

British Literary Manuscripts Online

British Literary Manuscripts Online logo If you want to explore the most important British literary works written between 1100 and 1900,  British Literary Manuscripts Online is the database to use. This digitized collection of manuscripts by British authors contains poems, plays, novels, diaries, journals, correspondence, and other papers from major library collections, covering the Medieval period through the Victorian era. Thousands of writers from Thomas A’Becket to Richard Zouche are represented by the hundreds of thousands of page images. The original manuscripts are held in collections at major libraries, research universities, and museums around the world including the British Library, the National Library of Scotland, the Folger Shakespeare Library, the Huntington Library, Princeton University, and others.

In addition to its great value for literary scholars, since this primary source collection includes more than just the actual literary works themselves it is invaluable to researchers exploring the historical, cultural, social, and religious context of the eras in which these materials were written.

Shown below, a heavily edited  excerpt from an 1845 manuscript of Charles Dicken’s The Chimes, In Four Quarters from the collection of the National Art Library at the Victoria and Albert Museum shows the evolution of this work in Dicken’s own hand with large areas crossed out and altered.

brief excerpt from manuscript of work by Charles Dickens

The database is divided into two parts which can be searched separately or together: Medieval & Renaissance covering 1100-1660, and the 1660-1900 collection.

Three on the Third – May

Three on the Third is a monthly series in which we highlight three books new to the library collection. Summaries of the books will be provided along with shelf location and a link to the item in the catalog.  This month we have three exciting new additions to our collection.

No Turning Back: Life, Loss, and Hope in Wartime Syria
by Rania Abouzeid
Cover of the book: No Turning Back Life, Loss, and Hope in Wartime SyriaThis astonishing book by the prize-winning journalist Rania Abouzeid tells the tragedy of the Syrian War through the dramatic stories of four young people seeking safety and freedom in a shattered country. Extending back to the first demonstrations of 2011, No Turning Back dissects the tangle of ideologies and allegiances that make up the Syrian conflict. As protests ignited in Daraa, some citizens were brimming with a sense of possibility. A privileged young man named Suleiman posted videos of the protests online, full of hope for justice and democracy. A father of two named Mohammad, secretly radicalized and newly released from prison, saw a darker opportunity in the unrest. When violence broke out in Homs, a poet named Abu Azzam became an unlikely commander in a Free Syrian Army militia. The regime’s brutal response disrupted a family in Idlib province, where a nine-year-old girl opened the door to a military raid that caused her father to flee. As the bombings increased and roads grew more dangerous, these people’s lives intertwined in unexpected ways. Rania Abouzeid brings readers deep inside Assad’s prisons, to covert meetings where foreign states and organizations manipulated the rebels, and to the highest levels of Islamic militancy and the formation of ISIS. Based on more than five years of clandestine reporting on the front lines, No Turning Back is an utterly engrossing human drama full of vivid, indelible characters that shows how hope can flourish even amid one of the twenty-first century’s greatest humanitarian disasters.
DS98.6 .A26 2018
Catalog Link – No Turning Back

 

Unbelievable: My Front-row Seat to the Craziest Campaign in American History
by Katy Tur
Cover of the book Unbelievable: My front-row seat to the craziest campaign in American History.Called ‘disgraceful, ‘ ‘third-rate, ‘ and ‘not nice’ by Donald Trump, NBC News correspondent Katy Tur reported on–and took flak from–the most volatile presidential candidate in American history. Katy Tur lived out of a suitcase for a year and a half, following Trump around the country, powered by packets of peanut butter and kept clean with dry shampoo. She visited forty states with the candidate, made more than 3,800 live television reports, and tried to endure a gazillion loops of Elton John’s ‘Tiny Dancer’ — a Trump rally playlist staple. From day 1 to day 500, Tur documented Trump’s inconsistencies, fact-checked his falsities, and called him out on his lies. In return, Trump repeatedly singled Tur out. He tried to charm her, intimidate her, and shame her. At one point, he got a crowd so riled up against Tur, Secret Service agents had to walk her to her car. Through all the long nights, wild scoops, naked chauvinism, dodgy staffers, and fevered debates, no one had a better view than Tur. This is her darkly comic and often scary story of how America sent a former reality show host to the White House. It’s also the story of what it was like for Tur to be there as it happened, inside a no-rules world where reporters were spat on, demeaned, and discredited. Tur was a foreign correspondent who came home to her most foreign story of all. Unbelievable is for anyone who still wakes up and wonders, Is this real life?
E911 .T87 2017
Catalog Link – Unbelievable

 

Urban Rage: the Revolt of the Excluded
by Mustafa Dikeç
Photo of the cover of the book Urban Rage: the Revolt of the Excluded.Riots are sweeping our cities: Cincinnati in 2001, Paris in 2005, Athens in 2008, London in 2011, Stockholm and Istanbul in 2013, Ferguson in 2014, Baltimore in 2015, and both Milwaukee and Charlotte in 2016. Unprecedented in size and scale for modern times, these uprisings have led to states of emergency, disruptions, fires and government crackdowns. Welcome to the era of urban rage. Professor Mustafa Dikec examines cities in mature democracies across the world, looking at how economic, social and political processes come together to produce concentrated poverty with severe disadvantages. While a particular police or government action may spark a revolt, Dikec shows that it is the genuine grievances overlooked by our democracies which give rise to these expressions of deep-seated rage. In this timely and incisive look at contemporary urban unrest, Dikec makes clear that change is only possible if we rethink the established practices of policing and policymaking and meet head on the failures of democratic systems.
HN18.3 .D55 2017
Catalog Link – Urban Rage

Digital and Information Literacies – a 2018 Key Issue in Teaching and Learning

Each year, the EDUCAUSE Learning Initiative (ELI) surveys individuals in higher education about what is most “exciting, pressing, consequential, and relevant” in teaching and learning. These key issues are published as part of their “7 Things You Should Know…” series.

The 2018 Key Issues in Teaching and Learning identified Digital and Information Literacies as the #5 issue. Digital and Information Literacies shows up on the “Key Issues” list regularly. In 2017, in part due to the 2016 election and the rise of “fake news” as a household phrase, the issue was #3, while in 2016 it was #11. Regardless of its place on the list, the fact that it is consistently present makes it a topic that institutions of higher education should be discussing and addressing.

ELI defines literacy as “the ability to find, evaluate, select, use, and create something.” And the focus on digital and information literacies is based on the demands of 21st-century learning and working, as they are identified by the National Council of Teachers of English. ELI highlights the extent to which technologies are changing the workforce and how many jobs that current students will have in their lifetimes do not exist yet. This makes it “critical for workers to be agile, adaptable, and willing to continue to learn.”

What is Randolph-Macon College doing to ensure our students are information and digitally literate?

  • Every ENGL 185 class has an information literacy component, often in partnership with a librarian who ensures that students know how to use the latest library resources in their research. Unfortunately many students can place out of ENGL 185, but students who take it learn not just how to find information (peer-reviewed articles, books, news stories), but also how to evaluate those resources in light of the assignment (the information need). Picking the right source to meet that need and using it properly  and ethically are also important parts of being information literate, and using the work of others to create something of your own, be it a research paper, poster, presentation, or anything else.
  • Librarians are available to meet with students one-on-one to discuss these topics, and are working to bring these skills, at a more complex level, to upper-division classes in the majors.
  • Digital literacy skills are being taught by the Instructional Design & Technology staff in workshops and sessions that teach digital storytelling and our electronic portfolio system.

These interactions with students provide a good foundation for addressing information and digital literacy needs on campus. Embedding these skills more formally into the curriculum and providing scaffolded support throughout a student’s four years at R-MC would strengthen students’ abilities in these areas, allowing them to transfer those skills to a work environment.

While the tools and the context will change over time, skills such as knowing how to evaluate information or media, taking into consideration issues of ownership and authorship, will help ensure that R-MC students have what they need to continue to be flexible and creative learners long after they graduate.

From Special Collections and Archives: The Evolution of the Library

As we prepare for a future expansion and renovation of the McGraw-Page Library, it’s fun to look back on how the College’s library has evolved, all of which is well-documented in the College Archives.

Although the College had a library housed in the Main Building in Boydton, library use for students was heavily restricted. The Board of Trustees set the rule as “the Library shall be opened at such times as the Faculty may appoint, and shall be kept open for one hour.” Since the College made library use difficult, the student members of the two literary societies, the Washington Society and the Franklin Society,  purchased and maintained extensive book collections for their members. Some of the oldest books in our collection still have bookplates from the societies. Upon the move to Ashland in 1868, the literary society libraries served as the primary libraries until 1886, when these books were formally given to the College for its library. Originally, this library was opened only one day a week from 11 A.M. until 6:30 P.M. By 1908, the Randolph-Macon College View Book indicates that the library was open daily for student use.

image of college lbrary in Wshington-Franklin Hall from 1908 View Book
Scene from College Library in Washington-Franklin Hall, 1908 View Book.

It wasn’t until 1923 when the first Walter Hines Page Library, now Peele Hall, opened for use that students had access to a proper library with study areas and full services overseen by a professional librarian. This library also served the Ashland community.

image of first Walter Hines Page Library, now Peele Hall
First Walter Hines Page Library, now Peele Hall

In 1961, the second Walter Hines Page Library was built, and with a 1984 addition that doubled its size,  a complete interior renovation, and a name change to McGraw-Page Library, this is the building we have today. On December 12, 1961, faculty and students formed a human chain and moved the entire library across Henry Street to the new building in one day, finishing before 6:00 p.m.

image of students moving books 1961
Students moving books, 1961
iamge of faculty moving books 1961
Faculty moving books, 1961

We have come a long way from the one hour rule in Boydton to the present, when we have hundreds of thousands of books, journals, and other databases available anytime, anywhere, as well as a 24/7 study area!

Student Final Projects

The R-MC Research Day is fast approaching. For course instructors who are finalizing the guidelines on student presentations, we at the Instructional Design & Technology are ready to work with you on the design and assessment of assignments. We also help students prepare effective presentations. We encourage faculty to contact Lily Zhang (zzhang@rmc.edu) for teaching a short session to the students about  technologies, including –

Students are welcome to stop by Instructional Design and Technology (or the Library Information desk). We will help you with the design and production. Here you can also borrow multimedia equipment and use software in the Library Media Pods.

For those who prefer self-paced video tutorials, Lynda.com offers well-designed training on techniques and tools. Simply check out a license by emailing zzhang@rmc.edu.

Lots of eBooks!

We have far more ebooks than printed books in the McGraw-Page Library, and these books are available 24/7 anytime, anywhere!   Some may be accessed in MaconCat, while others are accessed in our Discovery search or from several different databases. There are books in every subject area, and all are restricted for use by current Randolph-Macon College faculty, staff, and students only.

The largest of these is the EBSCO eBook Collection, which includes over 180,000 academic titles from a variety of publishers covering all subject areas. These books allow multiple users to read them simultaneously and may be browsed and read online or may be checked out and downloaded for off-line reading.

The Wiley eBook Collection includes over 20,000 titles from the publisher Wiley, best known for its excellent coverage in the sciences although all subject areas are well represented.

The Springer Behavioral Sciences and Psychology eBooks consists of hundreds of ebooks published by Springer from 2013 to present in psychology and the behavioral sciences and PsycBOOKS includes hundreds of ebooks in psychology and related fields published by the American Psychological Association and affiliated publishers.

ACLS Humanities E-Book Collection includes over 5,000 books in the humanities from several publishers. ATLA Historical Monographs Collection has over 30,000 works in religion and related fields dating from the 13th century to 1923. ARTFL is a collection of digitized French language and literature resources.

In addition to these larger collections, we have hundreds of reference books (Chicago Manual of Style Online, Credo Reference, Oxford Reference Online), and large numbers of  ebooks are also available in various other library databases!