Info-to-Go

 

The McGraw-Page Library hosted the first annual Info-to-Go session for faculty in December. It introduced new resources and services the Library developed and organized to facilitate teaching, learning and research. The slides in the file INFO to GO cover the resources and services.

Resources at Your Fingertips

Canvas Integration of Learning and Research Resources

The new “Library Resources” link in Canvas courses is specific to the subject. For instance, in HIST_100 course site, “Library Resources” points to resources for researching in the field of History. Within a Canvas site, the instructor and students can search databases, eBooks, catalog and Special Collections/Archives items … All at once!

Also integrated are textbook publishers’ online resources. When the link is activated by the instructor, students can access McGraw-Hill Connect and Cengage Mindlinks from within Canvas; the student’s grades from taking quizzes in the publisher’s site will be automatically “pushed” into the Canvas gradebook.

G-Suite
G-Suite is R-MC sponsored service you may use for saving and sharing instructional and professional materials. This Google cloud-based service, which includes most Google Apps except Gmail, offers the user unlimited storage space.  Tools such as Google Forms and YouTube are particularly useful. Google Forms allows one to easily create surveys and signup forms. YouTube generates closed-captioning for uploaded videos. Closed-captioning is important for instructional videos for ADA-compliance. To start using G-Suite, go to www.google.com, and use your R-MC email username and password to log in. Details of G-Suite is at the R-MC instranet (R-MC login required for access). Contact Lily Zhang for questions and assistance.

Yellow Jackets in the Stacks

Up-close image of a yellow jacket stickerA yellow jacket sticker on the spines of books in the library indicates that the work was written by a member of the Randolph-Macon College community. The McGraw-Page Library has nearly 1000 works written by current and former R-MC students, faculty, and staff. Books by Randolph-Macon College writers are found in the College Archives and the Juvenile and Popular Reading collections, as well as in the circulating collection on the second floor.

You may find these books in the catalog by searching for “Publications of alumni (Randolph-Macon College)” or “Publications of faculty and staff (Randolph-Macon College)” (you may need to login to view results).

Seek them out and you might be inspired to become a future “Yellow Jacket in the Stacks.” #RMClib

Yellow Jacket Stickers on books in the stacks.

From Special Collections and Archives: Before YouTube, There Were Magic Lanterns

Generations of Sunday school classes and churchgoers were educated by Magic Lantern slide shows. These shows, popular in the 19th century and into the mid 20th century, were replaced with newer technology such as slide projectors, film strips, powerpoint presentations and online videos. The two projectors shown here are part of the Methodist Collection housed in Special Collections and Archives. For more information on Magic Lanterns, see: http://library.sdsu.edu/pdf/scua/ML_Gazette/MLGvol27no04.pdf

image of Magic Lanterns sitting on a shelf
Magic Lantern

 

Three on the Third – January 2018 – Draft

I Was Told to Come Alone
by Souad Mekhennet
Cover of the book I Was Told to Come Alone.The journalist who broke the “Jihadi John” story draws on her personal experience to bridge the gap between the Muslim world and the West and explain the rise of Islamic radicalism. Souad Mekhennet has lived her entire life between worlds. The daughter of a Turkish mother and a Moroccan father, she was born and educated in Germany and has worked for several American newspapers. Since the 9/11 attacks she has reported stories among the most dangerous members of her religion. When she is told to come alone to an interview, she never knows what awaits at her destination. In this book, Mekhennet seeks to answer the question, “What is in the minds of these young jihadists, and how can we understand and defuse it?” She has unique and exclusive access into the world of jihad and sometimes her reporting has put her life in danger. We accompany her from Germany to the heart of the Muslim world — from the Middle East to North Africa, from Sunni Pakistan to Shia Iran, and the Turkish/ Syrian border region where ISIS is a daily presence. She then returns to Europe, first in London, where she uncovers the identity of the notorious ISIS executioner “Jihadi John,” and then in Paris and Brussels, where terror has come to the heart of Western civilization. Too often we find ourselves unable to see the human stories behind the headlines, and so Mekhennet — with a foot in many different camps — is the ideal guide to take us where no Western reporter can go.
HV 6433 .I722 I8562 2017
Catalog Link – I was told to come alone

 

Boys Among Men
by Jonathan Abrams
Cover of the book Boys Among Men.When Kevin Garnett shocked the world by announcing that he would not be attending college — as young basketball prodigies were expected to do — but instead enter the 1995 NBA draft directly from high school, he blazed a trail for a generation of teenage basketball players to head straight for the pros. That trend would continue until the NBA instituted an age limit in 2005, requiring all players to attend college or another developmental program for at least one year. Over that decade-plus period, the list of players who made that difficult leap includes some of the most celebrated players of the modern era — Garnett, Kobe Bryant, LeBron James, Dwight Howard, Tracy McGrady, and numerous other stars. It also includes notable “busts” who either physically or mentally proved unable to handle the transition. But for better or for worse, the face of the NBA was forever changed by the prep-to-pro generation.
POP GV 885.514 .A37 2016
Catalog Link – Boys Among Men

 

I Can’t Make This Up
by Kevin Hart
Cover of I Can't Make This Up.Actor and comedian Kevin Hart grew up in North Philadelphia. His father was a drug addict who was in and out of jail. His brother was a crack dealer and petty thief. And his mother was overwhelmingly strict, beating him with belts, frying pans, and his own toys. In his literary debut, he takes the reader on a journey through what his life was, what it is today, and how he’s overcome each challenge to become the man he is today. Hart sees life as a collection of chapters that each person gets to write for himself or herself. “Not only do you get to choose how you interpret each chapter, but your interpretation writes the next chapter,” he says. “So why not choose the interpretation that serves your life the best?”
POP PN 2287 .H26 A3 2017
Catalog Link – I Can’t Make This Up

Academic Library = Community, not Books

The video below (highlighted by the Scholarly Kitchen blog last week) discusses the success of independent bookstore in spite of online retailers such as Amazon.com.

If we see our product as books, and what we compete on as price, we lose. If we see our product as a service and a community, of which books are one piece, then we can compete. –David Sandberg

As is the case for independent bookstores, the “product” of an academic library has changed. It is no longer just a warehouse of books and the other resources. Rather the academic library provides a place for the community of scholars that exists on the college campus, and the resources are a piece of that community.

Like any community, a community of scholars includes experts (the faculty) and newbies (undergraduates). Courses, readings, research papers, and projects help to bring undergraduates into the community they are choosing to join, be it political science, business, English literature, or education, and moves them ever-closer to being experts themselves.

The academic library is the “intellectual hub” that supports that endeavor, providing the resources, people, services, and tools that make it possible. It has been almost twenty years since academic libraries functioned primarily as warehouses for resources, yet we’re still battling out-dated perceptions of what we do. I look forward to changing the conversation on R-MC’s campus.