HeinOnline Government, Politics, and Law

New this year is HeinOnline Government, Politics, and Law, a database containing over 100 million pages of fully searchable content from more than 156,000 titles and 310,000 volumes. Covering both contemporary and historic information with full text and original page images, this is our new go-to database for legal and government information, replacing much of the legal content formerly found in LexisNexis Academic to which we no longer subscribe. Included are a law journal database of over 3000 full text publications, all volumes of the Congressional Record, complete coverage of federal laws and legislation, all United States Treaties, constitutions for every country in the world, classic books from the 18th & 19th centuries, and more! Full text of state and federal case law powered by Fastcase is included.

The entire database can be searched or you may browse by subject areas or choose among several smaller databases including:

Brennan Center for Justice Publications from NYU School of Law
Criminal Justice in America: U.S. Attorney General Opinions, Reports, and Publications
Gun Regulation and Legislation in America
Federal Register/Code of Federal Regulations
Foreign Relations of the United States
History of International Law
Law Journal Library
Legal Classics
John F. Kennedy Assassination Collection
Pentagon Papers
Religion and the Law
U.S. Attorney General Opinions, Reports, and Publications
U.S. Code
U.S. Congressional Documents
U.S. Federal Legislative
U.S. Presidential Library
U.S. Statutes at Large
U.S. Supreme Court Library
Women and the Law
World Constitutions Illustrated
Treaties and Agreements

Users can create MyHein accounts to customize their experience. When logged in, you can bookmark articles, create notes, save search queries,  set up alerts to be informed of newly published materials, and more.

If you have any questions about HeinOnline, please contact your subject librarian

From Special Collections and Archives: 1859 Graduation Program

Among the memorabilia in the College Archives are numerous graduation programs, films, speeches and other items showcasing this very special day of celebration.

One of the most interesting of these is a graduation program belonging to Leroy Summerfield Edwards, Class of 1859. Graduation at that time was a multi-day event, and each student was required to make a lengthy speech; Leroy’s speech, Literary Dietetics, is also available in the College Archives. The jubilation of their college graduation ceremony and the hopeful futures the students in the Class of 1859 expected during those June days of 1859 would later be squelched by the Civil War. Leroy annotated his program indicating the tragic wartime fates of several of his classmates. Of the 19 graduates listed, 4 are labeled “killed” and 2 labeled “dead” and “died.” Those listed as killed died from battle wounds, while the two listed as dead and died were Leroy’s closest friends, who died a year apart of disease. An additional graduate has “lost right arm at Strasburg” next to his name. Leroy himself would be wounded, recover and go back to the war, be captured and spend nearly a year in two prison camps, including the famous Elmira, NY camp know as “Helmira.” He was paroled and returned to Virginia in time to flee Richmond with the Confederate army and surrender at Appomattox Courthouse.

The survivors of the Class of 1859 would become educators, ministers, lawyers, judges, legislators, and even college presidents, including Dr. William G. Starr, the 9th president of R-MC (1899-1902).

1859 graduation program page 1

1859 graduation prgram page 2

1859 graduation program page 3

 

 

 

British Literary Manuscripts Online

British Literary Manuscripts Online logo If you want to explore the most important British literary works written between 1100 and 1900,  British Literary Manuscripts Online is the database to use. This digitized collection of manuscripts by British authors contains poems, plays, novels, diaries, journals, correspondence, and other papers from major library collections, covering the Medieval period through the Victorian era. Thousands of writers from Thomas A’Becket to Richard Zouche are represented by the hundreds of thousands of page images. The original manuscripts are held in collections at major libraries, research universities, and museums around the world including the British Library, the National Library of Scotland, the Folger Shakespeare Library, the Huntington Library, Princeton University, and others.

In addition to its great value for literary scholars, since this primary source collection includes more than just the actual literary works themselves it is invaluable to researchers exploring the historical, cultural, social, and religious context of the eras in which these materials were written.

Shown below, a heavily edited  excerpt from an 1845 manuscript of Charles Dicken’s The Chimes, In Four Quarters from the collection of the National Art Library at the Victoria and Albert Museum shows the evolution of this work in Dicken’s own hand with large areas crossed out and altered.

brief excerpt from manuscript of work by Charles Dickens

The database is divided into two parts which can be searched separately or together: Medieval & Renaissance covering 1100-1660, and the 1660-1900 collection.

From Special Collections and Archives: The Evolution of the Library

As we prepare for a future expansion and renovation of the McGraw-Page Library, it’s fun to look back on how the College’s library has evolved, all of which is well-documented in the College Archives.

Although the College had a library housed in the Main Building in Boydton, library use for students was heavily restricted. The Board of Trustees set the rule as “the Library shall be opened at such times as the Faculty may appoint, and shall be kept open for one hour.” Since the College made library use difficult, the student members of the two literary societies, the Washington Society and the Franklin Society,  purchased and maintained extensive book collections for their members. Some of the oldest books in our collection still have bookplates from the societies. Upon the move to Ashland in 1868, the literary society libraries served as the primary libraries until 1886, when these books were formally given to the College for its library. Originally, this library was opened only one day a week from 11 A.M. until 6:30 P.M. By 1908, the Randolph-Macon College View Book indicates that the library was open daily for student use.

image of college lbrary in Wshington-Franklin Hall from 1908 View Book
Scene from College Library in Washington-Franklin Hall, 1908 View Book.

It wasn’t until 1923 when the first Walter Hines Page Library, now Peele Hall, opened for use that students had access to a proper library with study areas and full services overseen by a professional librarian. This library also served the Ashland community.

image of first Walter Hines Page Library, now Peele Hall
First Walter Hines Page Library, now Peele Hall

In 1961, the second Walter Hines Page Library was built, and with a 1984 addition that doubled its size,  a complete interior renovation, and a name change to McGraw-Page Library, this is the building we have today. On December 12, 1961, faculty and students formed a human chain and moved the entire library across Henry Street to the new building in one day, finishing before 6:00 p.m.

image of students moving books 1961
Students moving books, 1961

iamge of faculty moving books 1961
Faculty moving books, 1961

We have come a long way from the one hour rule in Boydton to the present, when we have hundreds of thousands of books, journals, and other databases available anytime, anywhere, as well as a 24/7 study area!

Lots of eBooks!

We have far more ebooks than printed books in the McGraw-Page Library, and these books are available 24/7 anytime, anywhere!   Some may be accessed in MaconCat, while others are accessed in our Discovery search or from several different databases. There are books in every subject area, and all are restricted for use by current Randolph-Macon College faculty, staff, and students only.

The largest of these is the EBSCO eBook Collection, which includes over 180,000 academic titles from a variety of publishers covering all subject areas. These books allow multiple users to read them simultaneously and may be browsed and read online or may be checked out and downloaded for off-line reading.

The Wiley eBook Collection includes over 20,000 titles from the publisher Wiley, best known for its excellent coverage in the sciences although all subject areas are well represented.

The Springer Behavioral Sciences and Psychology eBooks consists of hundreds of ebooks published by Springer from 2013 to present in psychology and the behavioral sciences and PsycBOOKS includes hundreds of ebooks in psychology and related fields published by the American Psychological Association and affiliated publishers.

ACLS Humanities E-Book Collection includes over 5,000 books in the humanities from several publishers. ATLA Historical Monographs Collection has over 30,000 works in religion and related fields dating from the 13th century to 1923. ARTFL is a collection of digitized French language and literature resources.

In addition to these larger collections, we have hundreds of reference books (Chicago Manual of Style Online, Credo Reference, Oxford Reference Online), and large numbers of  ebooks are also available in various other library databases!

 

From Special Collections and Archives: Fishtales

 

Cover of 1957-1958 Fish-Tales, the R-MC Student handbook, with cartoon Pogo drawing
Fish Tales, 1957-58

The 1957-1958 edition of Fish-Tales, the R-MC student handbook, is notable for the drawing of Pogo, a popular cartoon character of the era drawn by Walt Kelly, in a Randolph-Macon freshman beanie. Assistant Editor Tom Inge, who later returned to R-MC as Dr. Thomas Inge, Blackwell Professor of Humanities, solicited this and drawings from several other prominent cartoonists for inclusion.

In 1933, the first student handbook was produced by the Y.M.C.A., which had a large membership among the students. Originally entitled Handbook of Randolph-Macon College, this was meant as a guide to college life for incoming students and included a college map, descriptions of student clubs and fraternities, sports schedules, important phone numbers, listings of faculty, and other essential information that now we find online. Advertisements from local businesses funded its printing for many years. Starting in 1946, the student government took over the production of the handbook until 1969, when it transitioned to the Dean of Students’ office.

The title Fish-Tales first appears on the 1948-1949 edition. As this handbook was still geared towards freshman, the title was derived from R-MC’s local term for its newest class members, “fish,” so-named because when they arrived on campus, so did large rains that flooded the campus. In 1967, the hyphen was dropped making it Fish Tales, and in 2001 the words were merged into Fishtales. Over the years the content shifted from practical tips and general information about the College for freshman to a focus on College policies and procedures for all students. The College Archives has copies of most of the years of Fishtales, including the contemporary ones that are produced online only.

Learn about other specialized and unique collections in the Flavia Reed Owen Special Collections and Archives.

Looking for 20th Century News? Use Magazine Archives!

Before Facebook, Twitter, and even television, weekly print news magazines captured national and world events and provided analysis and interpretation for most Americans. Collectively, these magazines had 10s of millions of weekly readers.

Our database, Magazine Archives, includes the full text of five of the most important 20th century popular news and business magazines: Time, Life, Forbes, Fortune, and Bloomberg Businessweek. Coverage is from the beginning of each magazine through 2000, with start dates ranging from 1917 for Fortune and Life starting the latest in 1936. Magazines can be searched, as Magazine Archives, or individually (all links are for current R-MC users only).

Time Magazine - first cover        LIFE magazine logo         Fortunae magazine logo

Forbes magazine logo        Bloomeberg Businessweek logo

(Images courtesy Wikimedia Commons)

Life was known for its photojournalism and many of the most famous images of the 20th century were published in this magazine, which covered both national and international events, politics, and culture. Time magazine has always been known for its in-depth coverage of the people who create the news in national and international current events, politics, sports, and entertainment. Forbes, Fortune, and Bloomberg Businessweek cover various aspects of business and economics with extensive coverage of the events and news that shape our world.

These primary source materials are invaluable in helping us understand the 20th century from the perspective of those that lived it.

From Special Collections and Archives: The Casanova Collection

The J. Rives Childs Collection of Casanoviana at Randolph-Macon College was a bequest from J. Rives Childs, a 1915 R-MC alumnus and retired diplomat, who collected these materials during his more than 30 years in the Foreign Service in Europe and the Middle East. It is one of the world’s most extensive collections of early and rare editions of Casanova’s Memoires, consisting of over 2000 items including numerous rare volumes in many languages ranging from Norwegian to Bengali to Arabic and includes the first edition, published in German.  In addition to the Memoires and writings of Casanova, the collection contains bibliographies, biographies, sales catalogs, correspondence, playbills, illustrations, operettas, films, and of course, the Casanova action figure. Casanova’s lurid tales of romantic escapades during his life as an adventurer across Europe made his name synonymous with seduction and  womanizing.

Childs, a self-proclaimed “defender of Casanova as something other than the caricatures drawn of him by the mythmakers,” published biographical and bibliographical works on Casanova, the great lover, spy, adventurer, author, and librarian.

Learn more about the Casanova collection and other specialized and unique collections in the Flavia Reed Owen Special Collections and Archives.

Need Data? Try ICPSR Data Sets

Randolph-Macon College is one of over 750 members of the Inter-University Consortium for Political and Social Research, known as ICPSR.

The ICPSR houses the world’s largest online repository of data sets for social science researchers, with more than 250,000 files of research in the social and behavioral sciences. Although predominantly social science-related data in areas such as education, aging, criminal justice, substance abuse, and terrorism, there are many data sets on a variety of topics related to the sciences, history, and other disciplines. These data sets are available for download and use by the entire R-MC community and are used with statistical software, such as SAS, SPSS, and Stata. Computer labs on campus already have SPSS installed.

Data sets range from studies such as Historical Transportation of Navigable Rivers, Canals, and Railroads in the United States to the National Surveys on Energy and the Environment, Fall 2008 and Fall 2015 to the American College Catalog Study Database, 1975-2011. In addition to locating data sets by broad topic, by title, or by keyword, you can also search by the variables in the studies as well as locate publications in which the data sets have been used.  Documentation for interpreting the data files as well as copies of surveys, questionnaires and other supporting materials are included.

To get started, Just click on the Log In/Create Account link at Inter-University Consortium for Political and Social Research from a campus computer and create an account.

From Special Collections and Archives: Before YouTube, There Were Magic Lanterns

Generations of Sunday school classes and churchgoers were educated by Magic Lantern slide shows. These shows, popular in the 19th century and into the mid 20th century, were replaced with newer technology such as slide projectors, film strips, powerpoint presentations and online videos. The two projectors shown here are part of the Methodist Collection housed in Special Collections and Archives. For more information on Magic Lanterns, see: http://library.sdsu.edu/pdf/scua/ML_Gazette/MLGvol27no04.pdf

image of Magic Lanterns sitting on a shelf
Magic Lantern