2018-2023 Strategic Plan – Part 1, Mission & Vision

In May 2018, staff of the McGraw-Page Library finalized the Library’s new strategic plan. Intended to set the strategic direction for the next five years, the strategic plan includes new mission and vision statements, and outlines the Library’s top priorities. My posts over the next few months will introduce the strategic plan. 

McGraw-Page Library Mission

The McGraw-Page Library supports the mission of the College by providing quality resources and innovative services that foster lifelong learning through exploration, discovery, and creativity.  

The Library is an integral part of Randolph-Macon College academic success. We provide resources that support student projects and, to a somewhat lesser extent, faculty research, and those resources are vetted according to our professional standards. That means that we don’t just add the latest bestseller on a topic, but we evaluate publishers, authors, and platforms and read reviews to ensure that high-quality resources are available. Similarly, we look at our services, and at ideas for new services, in light of campus need and the value that a service can provide the library and the College.

The goal to foster lifelong learning is found on many college campuses, and in many library mission statements, because the value of a college education cannot be truly experienced until after graduation. If learning only happens for the four years a student attends classes, its ability to impact the rest of their life is severely limited. But if a student can continue to learn, and thus adapt to the changes that life brings, their potential for success is higher. So the mission of the library is not to serve up ready-made, easily-digested packets of information, but to provide the tools needed for students to find what they need, explore what they’re interested in, and broaden their horizons. This puts students in control of the process and prepares them for the complex information environment that exists in the “real world.”

McGraw-Page Library Vision

The McGraw-Page Library strives to be the intellectual center of Randolph-Macon College. We encourage multi- and inter-disciplinarity through active participation in the academic and creative life of the College. We create vibrant, welcoming physical and virtual environments that support teaching, learning, research, and discovery. We collect, preserve, promote, and facilitate access to the best scholarly and educational resources in a variety of formats, and excel at innovative and responsive services. We educate members of the campus community in the use of academic and technological resources in order to prepare them for a complex information environment. We foster a culture of inclusiveness that reflects and respects the diversities of our community.

As the intellectual center of the R-MC campus, the Library would like to be a neutral space in which members of different disciplines, both students and faculty, can meet to share ideas and projects. It is easy to focus on one’s own major or area of interest and to simply be unaware of the research or conversations happening elsewhere. The library would like to be a place where interdisciplinarity and multidisciplinarity can thrive, where projects can be showcased, where students can learn from one another’s work.

We have a vision that our physical space will be intellectually and creatively inspiring to those who use it, as well as easy to navigate and use.  We plan to continue investing in our physical and digital collections so that they support the College’s evolving curriculum, as well as faculty research, and so that they reflect the diversity of the campus community. We view the library not as a passive repository for resources that are available on-demand, but as a proactive organization that is reaching out to users, engaging with them, and educating them about the tools, resources, and processes that can help them succeed both academically and beyond.

Next month’s post will explore the McGraw-Page Library’s values and priorities, and in March and April, our five strategic goals will be introduced.

Three on the Third – January

Three on the Third is a monthly series in which we highlight three books new to the library collection. Summaries of the books are provided from publisher’s websites, along with shelf location and a link to the item in the catalog.  This month we have three exciting new additions to our POP collection.

The Mamba Mentality 
by Kobe Bryant 

Cover of the book The Mamba Mentality.

The NBA great nicknamed “The Black Mamba” shares his knowledge and understanding of basketball, outlining his detailed approach to preparing both physically and mentally to succeed at the game and revealing the core of his “Mamba mentality.”
GV884.B794 A3 2018
Catalog Link – The Mamba Menta

 

Girl, Wash Your Face
by Rachel Hollis 

Cover of the book Girl, Wash Your Face.

Founder of the lifestyle website TheChicSite.com and CEO of her own media company, Rachel Hollis has created an online fan base by sharing tips for living a better life while fearlessly revealing the messiness of her own. Each chapter begins with a specific lie Hollis once believed that left her feeling overwhelmed, unworthy, or ready to give up. As a working mother, a former foster parent, and a woman who has dealt with insecurities about her body and relationships, she speaks with the insight and kindness of a BFF, helping women unpack the limiting mind-sets that destroy their self-confidence and keep them from moving forward. From her temporary obsession with marrying Matt Damon to a daydream involving hypnotic iguanas to her son’s request that she buy a necklace to “be like the other moms,” Hollis holds nothing back. With unflinching faith and tenacity, Hollis spurs other women to live with passion and hustle and to awaken their slumbering goals.
BV4527 .H658 2018
Catalog Link – Girl, Wash Your Face 

Hindsight & All the Things I Can’t See in Front of Me
by Justin Timberlake

Cover of the book Hindsight.

In his first book, Justin Timberlake creates a characteristically dynamic experience, one that combines an intimate, remarkable collection of anecdotes, reflections, and observations on his life and work with hundreds of candid photographs from his personal archives that range from his early years to the present day, in locations around the world, both on and off the stage. Justin discusses many aspects of his childhood, including his very early love of music and the inspiration behind many of his songs and albums. He talks about his songwriting process, offering the back story to many of his hits. He muses on his collaborations with other artists and directors, sharing the details of performances in concert, TV comedy, and film. He also reflects on who he is, examining what makes him tick, speaking candidly about fatherhood, family, close relationships, struggles, and his search to find an inner calm and strength. Living a creative life, observing and finding inspiration in the world, taking risks, and listening to an inner voice–this is Justin Timberlake.
ML420.T537 A3 2018
Catalog Link – Hindsight 

Three on the Third – December

Three on the Third is a monthly series in which we highlight three books new to the library collection. Summaries of the books are provided along with shelf location and a link to the item in the catalog.  This month we have three exciting new additions to our collection linking music with literature and history.

Novel Sounds: Southern Fiction in the Age of Rock and Roll
by Florence Dore

Cover of the book Novel Sounds.

The 1950’s witnessed both the birth of rock and roll and the creation of Southern literature as we know it. In Novel Sounds, Florence Dore tells the story of how these forms of expression became intertwined and shows how Southern writers absorbed rock music and its technologies – tape, radio, vinyl – to develop the “rock novel.” Dore considers the work of Southern writers like William Faulkner, Flannery O’Connor, and William Styron alongside the music of Bessie Smith, Lead Belly, and Bob Dylan to uncover deep historical links between rock and Southern literature.
PS261 .D67 2018
Catalog Link – Novel Sounds

What Will I Be
by Philip M. Gentry

Picture of the book What Will I Be.

In the wake of World War II, the cultural life of the United States underwent a massive transformation. At the heart of these changes during the early Cold War were the rise of the concept of identity and a reformulation of the country’s political life. A revolution in music was taking place at the same time-a tumult of new musical styles and institutions that would lead to everything from the birth of rock ‘n’ roll to the new downtown experimental music scene. Together, these new cultural and musical trends came to define the era. In the search for new social affinities and modes of self-fashioning, music provided just the right tool. What Shall I Be follows the concept of identity as it developed alongside new post-war music making. Author Philip M. Gentry travels through four very different musical scenes: the R&B world of doo-wop pioneers the Orioles, the early film musicals of Doris Day, Asian American cabaret in San Francisco, and John Cage’s infamous 4’33”. The lives of musicians, composers, critics, and fans reveal how individuals negotiated the social changes sweeping the country in the initial days of the Cold War. As we are again swept up in a time of significant transformation, these early strategies help to inform the political and musical narratives of today.
ML3917.U6 G46 2017
Catalog Link – What Will I Be

Rock and Romanticism
by James Rovira

Cover of the book Rock and Romanticism.

Rock and Romanticism: Blake, Wordsworth, and Rock from Dylan to U2 is an edited anthology that seeks to explain just how rock and roll is a Romantic phenomenon that retrospectively sheds light on what literary Romanticism was at its different points of origin and what it has become in the present. This book allows Byron and Wollstonecraft to speak back to contemporary theories of Romanticism through Bob Dylan, and the Rolling Stones. Relying on Lowy and Sayre’s particularly appropriate terms for rock as well as the origins of these emotions. In chapter topics ranging from Bob Dylan to U2 and Blackberry Smoke, this work examines how rock and roll expands, interprets, restates, interrogates, and conflicts with literary Romanticism, all the while understanding that as a term “rock and roll,” in reference to popular music from the late 1940’s through the early 2000’s, is every bit as contradictory and difficult to define as the word Romanticism itself.
ML3849 .R63 2018
Catalog Link – Rock and Romanticism


International Education Week Resources

Thinking about studying abroad?  The McGraw-Page Library has a display of books to help navigate the adventure of college outside of the United States.  Here are a few of our top picks:

Cover of the book Prepare for Departure by Shelley Story.

Prepare for Departure
by Shelley Story

Being prepared to go abroad isn’t achieved by packing the right things in your bags. Real preparation is built with plans, process, and practice. This book will walk you through all three, and give you a strong foundation that sets you up for your best possible study abroad experience.

LB2376 .S86 2016
Catalog Link – Prepare for Departure

Global Dexterity
by Andy Molinsky

What does it mean to be a global worker and a true “citizen of the world” today? It goes beyond merely acknowledging cultural differences. In reality, it means you are able to adapt your behavior to conform to new cultural contexts without losing your authentic self in the process. Not only is this difficult, it’s a frightening prospect for most people and something completely outside their comfort zone. But managing and communicating with people from other cultures is an essential skill today. Most of us collaborate with teams across borders and cultures on a regular basis, whether we spend our time in the office or out on the road. What’s needed now is a critical new skill, something author Andy Molinsky calls “global dexterity.” In this book Molinsky offers the tools needed to simultaneously adapt behavior to new cultural contexts while staying authentic and grounded in your own natural style. Based on more than a decade of research, teaching, and consulting with managers and executives around the world, this book reveals an approach to adapting while feeling comfortable–an essential skill that enables you to switch behaviors and overcome the emotional and psychological challenges of doing so. From identifying and overcoming challenges to integrating what you learn into your everyday environment, Molinsky provides a guidebook–and mentoring–to raise your confidence and your profile. Practical, engaging, and refreshing, “Global dexterity” will help you reach across cultures–and succeed in today’s global business environment.
HD62.4 .M64 2013
Catalog Link – Global Dexterity

Cover of the book Preparing to Study Abroad.

Preparing to Study Abroad: Learning to Cross Cultures
by Steven Taylor Duke

This book is designed to help you prepare for your study abroad experience so you can get the most from it, and gain critical intercultural skills while crossing cultures. It offers strategies for learning about and exploring cultural differences and similarities of the country you will visit; and advice about how to actively observe and participate in the life of the locality in which you will find yourself. Each chapter illustrates key concepts through the personal accounts of students. This book aims to help you with your own personal journey, and to make your study abroad experience as meaningful, rewarding, and insightful as possible.
LB2375 .D85 2014
Catalog Link – Preparing to Study Abroad

Find more resources on the Mc-Graw Page Library website.

Yellow Jackets in the Great War

According to James’ Scanlon’s history of Randolph-Macon College, 207 Randolph-Macon College alumni served in World War I. Eight of these RMC veterans lost their lives in the conflict.

Evan A. Edwards, R-MC Class of 1894, served as the Regimental Chaplain in the U. S. Army’s 140th Infantry (Sixth Missouri).

The regiment trained at Fort Doniphan in Oklahoma, shipping out to France in June 1918. The unit fought along the Western front as part of the Meuse-Argonne Offensive until the armistice was signed on November 11, 1918.

Edwards recounts his service with the unit in his memoir
From Doniphan to Verdun: The Official History of the 140th Infantry (Lawrence, Kansas: The World Company, 1920). 

The Library’s copy of Edwards’ book is inscribed: “Presented to R.M. College by the author, Jan. 1921” and is housed in the Randolph-Macon College Archives. 

The Great War and Randolph-Macon College

Randolph-Macon College students and faculty were commissioned as officers in the U.S. Army in 1918 in Plattsburgh, New York and returned to campus to start the Students’ Army Training Corps.

The Students’ Army Training Corps (SATC) was created in 1918 by the US War Department to expedite the training of soldiers during World War I. A SATC division was established at Randolph-Macon College in August 1918, providing students an opportunity to continue their studies while fulfilling their draft obligations. In addition to their RMC course work, the young men participated in military training exercises.

The SATC had a short and interrupted life at Randolph-Macon College. In October 1918, many RMC students were afflicted by the world-wide flu pandemic. When the armistice brought the war to end on November 11, 1918, the SATC soon demobilized until a similar training corps was established in World War II.

While the SATC helped the college maintain its enrollment during the war, President Robert E. Blackwell gave an unenthusiastic report of the Students’ Army Training Corps in a letter to a government official in December 1918.

“The influenza struck us the first of October before we had inducted a single man. For several weeks we were struggling with that without a single trained nurse and with nearly one third of the students in the hospital. During these weeks the classes met, but we could not expect to make any progress. After inductions took place and most of the students were out of the hospital, the attendance on the classes was not much better owing to various military duties. Every student, for instance, was on guard duty for twenty-four hours every sixth day and was in no condition to study or receive instruction the day after… The military work was done well and enthusiastically till November 11. Then all enthusiasm died out of that. Then everybody was too far behind in studies to take any interest in them. These are the short and simple annals of the S.A.T.C.   Very respectfully, R.E.B.”

Three on the Third – October

Three on the Third is a monthly series in which we highlight three books new to the library collection. Summaries of the books will be provided along with shelf location and a link to the item in the catalog.  This month we have three exciting new additions to our collection in the field of Criminology.

Intellectual Disability and the Death Penalty
by Marc J. Tasse & John H. Blume

This book documents the legal and clinical aspects of the issues related to intellectual disability and the death penalty.  Intellectual Disability and the Death Penalty provides a comprehensive review of the legal and clinical aspects of the death penalty and intellectual disability; offers a detailed discussion of the Supreme court decision in Atkins v. Virginia as well as a review of court decisions since that 2002 ruling; details the diagnostic issues related to determination of intellectual disability, such as the assessment of intellectual functioning, adaptive behavior, and age of onset; and shares best practices in clinical assessment and important forensic matters that must be considered.
KF9227.C2 T37 2018
Catalog Link – Intellectual Disability and the Death Penalty

Locking up our Own
by James Forman Jr.
An original and consequential argument about race, crime, and the law today, Americans are debating our criminal justice system with new urgency. Mass incarceration and aggressive police tactics–and their impact on people of color–are feeding outrage and a consensus that something must be done. But what if we only know half the story? In Locking Up Our Own, the Yale legal scholar and former public defender James Forman Jr. weighs the tragic role that some African Americans themselves played in escalating the war on crime. As Forman shows, the first substantial cohort of black mayors, judges, and police chiefs took office around the country amid a surge in crime. Many came to believe that tough measures–such as stringent drug and gun laws and “pretext traffic stops” in poor African American neighborhoods–were needed to secure a stable future for black communities. Some politicians and activists saw criminals as a “cancer” that had to be cut away from the rest of black America. Others supported harsh measures more reluctantly, believing they had no other choice in the face of a public safety emergency. Drawing on his experience as a public defender and focusing on Washington, D.C., Forman writes with compassion for individuals trapped in terrible dilemmas–from the young men and women he defended to officials struggling to cope with an impossible situation. The result is an original view of our justice system as well as a moving portrait of the human beings caught in its coils.
HV9950 .F67 2018
Catalog Link – Locking up our Own

A Conviction in Question
by Jim Freedman
An engrossing narrative of the first case to appear at the International Criminal Court, A Conviction in Question documents the trial of Union of Congolese Patriots leader and warlord Thomas Lubanga Dyilo. Although Lubanga’s crimes – including murder, rape, and the forcible conscription of child soldiers – were indisputable, legal wrangling and a clash of personalities caused the trial to be prolonged for an unprecedented six years. This book offers an accessible account of the rapid evolution of international law and the controversial trial at the foundation of the International Criminal Court. A Conviction in Question examines the legal issues behind each of the trial’s critical moments, including the participation of Lubanga’s victims at the trial and the impact of witness protection. Through eye-witness observation and analysis, Jim Freedman shows that the trial suffered from all the problems associated with ordinary criminal law trials, and uses the Lubanga case to further comment on the role of international courts in a contemporary global context.
KZ1216.D95 F74 2017
Catalog Link – A Conviction in Question

What’s New @ the McGraw-Page Library–Fall 2018 Edition

There have been some changes to the library and its resources this summer! Read below to learn what’s new and how it may impact you.

What’s New?

  • The new library website is now live! The new website makes navigation easier so that library information and resources are easier to fine.
  • The library’s DVD collection has been relocated to the shelves next to and behind the current journals. This has allowed us to remove a tall shelf on the main level of the library, making it feel more open.

Canvas & Folio Workshops

  • Canvas and Folio workshops will be happening through August 28, and additional Instructional Design & Technology workshops for students and faculty will be offered throughout the fall. View the schedule of workshops.

Course Reserves

  • Physical materials: Books (library or personal copies), DVDs, and other physical items can be put on reserve at the Library Information Desk. Faculty should allow at least 48 hours for course materials to be put on reserve. View guidelines for placing materials on reserve, or contact Luke Haushalter with questions at (804) 752-7302 or LukeHaushalter@rmc.edu.
  • Digital materials: Articles and streaming videos that are available in Kanopy or other databases can be posted directly in Canvas. Save time using these guidelines for Creating Persistent Links so that students can access these resources off-campus. Questions about persistent links? Contact Nancy Falciani-White at (804) 752-7256 or NancyFalcianiWhite@rmc.edu. Questions about Canvas? Contact Lily Zhang at 752-3216 or zzhang@rmc.edu.

Research Instruction

  • Librarians are available to provide research instruction in R-MC classes. You can bring your class to the library, or we can come to the regular classroom. Librarians can help students learn how to search relevant research databases effectively, construct research questions, evaluate sources, and think about information from an academic perspective. Contact your subject librarian to learn more.
  • The subject guides that the library has created continue to be linked in Canvas courses under the “Library Resources” navigation. If you’d like to recommend changes to your guide, contact your subject librarian.

Review your Library Account

  • Now is a great time to review what you have checked out from the library and renew or return items. View and renew your checked out items via MaconCat, or contact Information Desk staff. 

New Resources

We have added several exciting new collections since the spring. All are available through the Databases tab on the new website, and are available to current R-MC students, staff, and faculty.

  • Access World News provides access to news from around the world. This database replaces the news content previously found in LexisNexis and America’s News.
  • Atlantic Monthly Archive
  • HeinOnline Government, Politics, & Law is the world’s largest fully searchable, image-based government document and legal research database.
  • Nation Magazine Archive
  • National Review Archive
  • New Republic Archive
  • Oxford Art Online: Contains Grove Dictionary of Art and Benezit Dictionary of Artists
  • Richmond Times-Dispatch Archive
  • U.S. News & World Report Archive
  • Vanderbilt Television News Archive

As always, your comments or questions are welcome. Please send them to library@rmc.edu or contact your R-MC Subject Librarian.

Infographics and Course Assignments

Infographics combines “information” and “graphics”; it allows using visual presentations to communicate simple or sophisticated concepts. TIMES magazine – based on the Pew Research Center data – has created this infographics to illustrate “Is College Worth it?”.  The design and use of text, images, colors and layout make the data-intensive presentation straightforward for public audience.

Infographic assignments offer an alternative to traditional writing assignments, and are gradually gaining attention in higher education.  Online Infographic tools provide hundreds of templates and theme categories, removing technology and design barriers for students. Students can focus on content and data selection in communicating concepts and viewpoints (EDUCAUSE, 2013).  This blog, hosted by College of William & Mary, details why and how to design such assignments.

At R-MC, we have obtained trial licenses for the tool Venngage. Currently two faculty members are testing to integrate it into courses. A future Library blog will share their experiences.  The free version requires creating user account and gives access to many design templates. It does not allow final work to be saved as PDF.

 

 

Three on the Third – May

Three on the Third is a monthly series in which we highlight three books new to the library collection. Summaries of the books will be provided along with shelf location and a link to the item in the catalog.  This month we have three exciting new additions to our collection.

No Turning Back: Life, Loss, and Hope in Wartime Syria
by Rania Abouzeid
Cover of the book: No Turning Back Life, Loss, and Hope in Wartime SyriaThis astonishing book by the prize-winning journalist Rania Abouzeid tells the tragedy of the Syrian War through the dramatic stories of four young people seeking safety and freedom in a shattered country. Extending back to the first demonstrations of 2011, No Turning Back dissects the tangle of ideologies and allegiances that make up the Syrian conflict. As protests ignited in Daraa, some citizens were brimming with a sense of possibility. A privileged young man named Suleiman posted videos of the protests online, full of hope for justice and democracy. A father of two named Mohammad, secretly radicalized and newly released from prison, saw a darker opportunity in the unrest. When violence broke out in Homs, a poet named Abu Azzam became an unlikely commander in a Free Syrian Army militia. The regime’s brutal response disrupted a family in Idlib province, where a nine-year-old girl opened the door to a military raid that caused her father to flee. As the bombings increased and roads grew more dangerous, these people’s lives intertwined in unexpected ways. Rania Abouzeid brings readers deep inside Assad’s prisons, to covert meetings where foreign states and organizations manipulated the rebels, and to the highest levels of Islamic militancy and the formation of ISIS. Based on more than five years of clandestine reporting on the front lines, No Turning Back is an utterly engrossing human drama full of vivid, indelible characters that shows how hope can flourish even amid one of the twenty-first century’s greatest humanitarian disasters.
DS98.6 .A26 2018
Catalog Link – No Turning Back

 

Unbelievable: My Front-row Seat to the Craziest Campaign in American History
by Katy Tur
Cover of the book Unbelievable: My front-row seat to the craziest campaign in American History.Called ‘disgraceful, ‘ ‘third-rate, ‘ and ‘not nice’ by Donald Trump, NBC News correspondent Katy Tur reported on–and took flak from–the most volatile presidential candidate in American history. Katy Tur lived out of a suitcase for a year and a half, following Trump around the country, powered by packets of peanut butter and kept clean with dry shampoo. She visited forty states with the candidate, made more than 3,800 live television reports, and tried to endure a gazillion loops of Elton John’s ‘Tiny Dancer’ — a Trump rally playlist staple. From day 1 to day 500, Tur documented Trump’s inconsistencies, fact-checked his falsities, and called him out on his lies. In return, Trump repeatedly singled Tur out. He tried to charm her, intimidate her, and shame her. At one point, he got a crowd so riled up against Tur, Secret Service agents had to walk her to her car. Through all the long nights, wild scoops, naked chauvinism, dodgy staffers, and fevered debates, no one had a better view than Tur. This is her darkly comic and often scary story of how America sent a former reality show host to the White House. It’s also the story of what it was like for Tur to be there as it happened, inside a no-rules world where reporters were spat on, demeaned, and discredited. Tur was a foreign correspondent who came home to her most foreign story of all. Unbelievable is for anyone who still wakes up and wonders, Is this real life?
E911 .T87 2017
Catalog Link – Unbelievable

 

Urban Rage: the Revolt of the Excluded
by Mustafa Dikeç
Photo of the cover of the book Urban Rage: the Revolt of the Excluded.Riots are sweeping our cities: Cincinnati in 2001, Paris in 2005, Athens in 2008, London in 2011, Stockholm and Istanbul in 2013, Ferguson in 2014, Baltimore in 2015, and both Milwaukee and Charlotte in 2016. Unprecedented in size and scale for modern times, these uprisings have led to states of emergency, disruptions, fires and government crackdowns. Welcome to the era of urban rage. Professor Mustafa Dikec examines cities in mature democracies across the world, looking at how economic, social and political processes come together to produce concentrated poverty with severe disadvantages. While a particular police or government action may spark a revolt, Dikec shows that it is the genuine grievances overlooked by our democracies which give rise to these expressions of deep-seated rage. In this timely and incisive look at contemporary urban unrest, Dikec makes clear that change is only possible if we rethink the established practices of policing and policymaking and meet head on the failures of democratic systems.
HN18.3 .D55 2017
Catalog Link – Urban Rage