Fairy Tale Beginnings in 3D

[This is a guest post from Visiting Instruction Librarian Gardner Treneman.]

Professor Valentine Balguerie’s French 273 – “Fairy Tale Beginnings” class was always about building imagery. Based on classic folk/fairy tales, the class was asked to read several and analyze the common elements found in them. Instead of the ten-page paper, Prof. Balguerie wanted her students to try something she thought would be more fun. This is where our conversation started.

I’d seen a project posted online from the artist Tom Burtonwood. He was looking at the newer wave of open source 3D printing – providing the ability for the masses to work in a new medium. His project website says,

Within this context of free cultural products I chose to publish Orihon the world’s first entirely 3D printable book. The subject matter for Orihon is derived from 3D scans made of sculptures and reliefs, found at the Art Institute of Chicago, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, the American Museum of Natural in New York and The Field Museum in Chicago.

This immediately drew my attention, and since his focus was the openness of this new platform, he provided the files on one of the internet’s largest 3D file sharing sites, Thingiverse. The idea was wonderful, but the technology as progressed quite far in the six years since he created his plates and hinges. So I took the modular plate and created a new hinge that harnessed the abilities of our Ulitmaker 3, namely the ability to print in two materials. This new hinge was able to flex like a standard paper book but still had the modular aspect. These were printed ahead of time since the students didn’t need to edit them.

3D printed book hinge with four printed strips

 

When it came time for the students’ work they were shown both Thingiverse and Sketchfab: two repositories of opensource 3D models. The idea was for them to display the themes found in the fairy tales through visual objects, placed in the book’s pages. We had a class period in the Library Lab where they started learning and working in the free modeling software Tinkercad. Over the next few weeks I received all the individual students’ work, and began printing them when they came in. Nine students with four pages a piece added up to a lot of hours on our two printers!

3D book and the book Notre Dame de Paris by Victor Hugo and a small round compact mirror
3D book showing themes from Notre Dame de Paris by Victor Hugo
3D book and the book Twilight with a small blond doll in a purple dress
3D book showing themes from Twilight

In the end every student had their own, custom book that covered their specific fairy tale. This project built on a short paper (written in French) that explained what the themes were, and how they connected to today’s world. Professor Balguerie called this a success and is now planning a project to have her class produce “classic” books: printed on paper, bound with thread. We at the McGraw-Page Library are really looking forward to helping with that!

The 3D books created in “Fairy Tale Beginnings” class have been on display in the McGraw-Page Library vestibule since mid-January.

Three on the Third March – Celebrating Women’s History Month

Three on the Third is a monthly series in which we highlight three books new to the library collection.  Summaries of the books are provided along with shelf location and a link to the item in the catalog.  This month we are featuring several exciting new additions to our collection related to Women’s History Month.

Time and Tide
by Catherine Clay
The first in-depth study of the landmark modern feminist magazine, Time and Tide.  UniqCover of the book Time and Tide.ue in establishing itself as the only female-run intellectual weekly in the golden age of the weekly review, Time and Tide both challenged persistent prejudices against women’s participation in public life and played an instrumental role in redefining women’s gender roles and identities. Drawing on extensive new archival research, Catherine Clay recovers the contributions to this magazine of both well- and lesser-known British women writers, editors, critics and journalists and explores a cultural dialogue about literature, politics and the arts that took place beyond the parameters of modernist ‘little magazines.’ The book makes a major contribution to the history of women’s writing and feminism in Britain between the wars.
PN5124 .W6 C53 2018
Catalog Link – Time and Tide

 

Broad Strokes: 15 Women who Made Art History
by Bridget Quinn
Cover of the book Broad Strokes.Historically, major women artists have been excluded from the mainstream art canon.  Aligned with the resurgence of feminism in pop culture, Broad Strokes offers an entertaining corrective to that omission. Art historian Bridget Quinn delves into the lives and careers of 15 brilliant female artists in text that’s smart, feisty, educational, and an enjoyable read. Replete with beautiful reproductions of the artists’ works and contemporary portraits of each artist by renowned illustrator Lisa Congdon, this is art history from 1600 to the present day for the modern art lover, reader, and feminist.
N8354 .Q47 2017
Catalog Link – Broad Strokes

The Art of Feminism: Images that Shaped the Fight for Equality
Cover of the book The Art of Feminism.
Since its inception, the women’s movement has harnessed the power of the image to transmit its message. From the posters of the Suffrage Atelier, to the photographs of Carrie Mae Weems, this comprehensive survey traces the ways in which feminists have shaped art and visual culture from the mid-nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries. Featuring more than 350 works of art, illustration, photography, performance, graphic design, and public protest, this stunning volume showcases the vibrancy and daring of the feminist aesthetic over the last 150 years.
N72.F45 A78 2018
Catalog Link – The Art of Feminism

 

2018-2023 Strategic Plan – Part 3, Strategic Areas 1 & 2

My last two posts have detailed the new mission and vision of the McGraw-Page Library, as well as the values and priorities that guide our decision-making. This month’s post will outline Strategic Areas 1 and 2. Next month will wrap up this series with a focus on Strategic Areas 3-5. 

Library staff have met to discuss the timeline of when we want to accomplish these tasks over the next five years, and have also assigned an individual who is responsible for ensuring that progress is being made on these goals. The Library is working to develop an assessment plan, which, when done, will work with our strategic plan to ensure we are making appropriate progress. 

As with any strategic plan, these goals are based on our understanding of our current environment. The specific objectives or goals may change if conditions (e.g., staffing, building, budget) change significantly. 

Our Strategic Areas, Goals, and Objectives

I. Improve the user’s experience of the library.
  1. Align library resources to the current needs of the curriculum and the student body
    1. Complete weeding of the library’s collections
  2. Improve the findability of library resources
    1. Review signage for accuracy and update as necessary
    2. Ensure resources can be found where expected (e.g., Subject Guides, Discovery)
    3. Review the library website and update or redesign as necessary 
  3. Improve the look and functionality of the library’s physical and virtual space
    1. Work toward and advocate for significant renovation of the library space 
    2. Review and replace worn furniture 
    3. Review physical space and identify immediate needs 
    4. Develop a style guide for print and electronic library-produced materials 
  4. Assess the user’s experience
    1. Develop and adopt a tool evaluating space usage
    2. Identify students’ space needs
II. Enhance information and technological literacy across campus.
  1. Map current instructional efforts 
  2. Develop and promote an information literacy plan for R-MC
    1. Identify courses where information literacy instruction would be advantageous (e.g., One essential, required course per major?)
    2. Develop strategic relationships with faculty with the goal of being invited to teach in those classes
    3. Assess research skills of students 
  3. Develop and implement a technological/digital literacy plan for R-MC 
  4. Participate in curriculum review conversations 

Social Explorer: A New Mapping Database for Social, Demographic, Economic, Environmental, and Health Data

Logo for Social Explorer

Social Explorer is an exciting new database that allows easy creation of maps and tables using a variety of data sources. Social Explorer includes social, demographic, economic, environmental, and health data covering a wide range of time periods, which vary by data source. The data comes from both public groups, such as government agencies and international organizations, and from private organizations, and is updated regularly as new information is released. Much of the data is for the United States, but there is also international data from the European Union, the World Bank, and others. Unlike most of the statistical and data sources to which we have access, this database’s strength is its mapping function, which allows you to easily create a visualization of the data rather than just viewing the data in tables, although it does that as well.

image of map depicting public pre-school enrollment in Virginia

Maps can be created at larger geographic points such as nations and states, or at small points such as census tracts and zip codes, with several selections in between. You can create multiple maps for side-by side comparison; for example, to illustrate changes over time for a single variable or compare a difference in geographic locations.

By setting up an account and logging in, you can save maps, develop presentations, create reports from the data, and customize the displays.

You can customize the maps in many ways, including changing the colors to preset selections or selecting your own custom colors, turning various display options on and off, displaying a map using satellite imagery, annotating the maps with your own labels, and even uploading your own data to create or alter maps.

The “Tell a Story” option allows you to put together a series of map or data slides and export the content to PowerPoint for easy use in presentations or on posters.

This database currently has a limit of 3 simultaneous Randolph-Macon users, so if you can’t get in to use it, try it again later!

From Special Collections and Archives: College Catalogs

page image of 1839 R-MC Catalog indicating the Course of Study for the Preparatory Department and the Freshman Class
1839 R-MC Catalog indicating the Course of Study for the Preparatory Department and the Freshman Class

Since its earliest days in Boydton, the College has published a catalog outlining the course of study, listing the faculty, and including a wide range of information that has changed over the years.  The oldest original in the College Archives is from October 1839, although we have a photocopy of the 1836 catalog held at an archive elsewhere. The catalogs provide us an excellent overview of the changes in the curriculum over time, as well as a glimpse into student life.

The 1839 catalog is only 14 pages, compared to contemporary R-MC catalogs of over 200 pages. Included is a full list of the College’s trustees, faculty, alumni, and enrolled students. The student listing even indicates the dormitory room in which they lived! There is also a listing of the students in the College’s Preparatory Department, the course of study for the Preparatory Department and for each term of college level study, information on the school calendar, expenses, and other general information, such as a statement on the final page that the “College discipline is mild and parental, but it will not tolerate indolence or vice” and that “no idle, disorderly, or immoral student can be permitted to remain….”

The catalog page displayed above shows the rigor of the curriculum and the emphasis on a classical education. Freshman read Virgil, Cicero, and Livy, and studied mathematics and geography. The right hand column indicates the author or editor of the text used, so in addition to knowing the content of the course, we know the textbooks students used and we even have several student textbooks from this era in our collection!  Upperclassmen studied subjects including   astronomy, chemistry, calculus, logic, political economy, mineralogy, and more classical studies.

In addition to the President, Landon C. Garland who taught Pure and Mixed Mathematics, there were seven other faculty members, although the position of Professor of Moral and Mental Philosophy, which translates today into Religious Studies, was vacant. There were professors for Ancient Languages, English Literature, and Experimental Sciences as well as “tutors” in Mathematics and languages. The tutors were instructors rather than the modern definition of tutors. The final faculty member was the principal of the preparatory school.

Tuition was $35 for the entire year, and board was set at $8 per month. Other student expenses included firewood, lights, bedding and laundry, and a category labeled “incidental expenses” at $15 which included textbooks and purchasing furniture for their dorm rooms, as the College did not provide furniture. The catalog also cautions parents against providing too much pocket money, deeming it potentially hurtful!

Learn more about the history of Randolph-Macon College.

Three on the Third, February – Celebrating Black History Month

Three on the Third is a monthly series in which we highlight three books new to the library collection.  Summaries of the books will be provided along with shelf location and a link to the item in the catalog.  This month we are featuring several exciting new additions to our collection.

We Will Win the Day
by Louis Moore

Cover of the book - We Will Win the Day.

James “Mudcat” Grant would not sing the right words. He knew they were a lie. Home of the Brave. Land of the Free. For who? Not black Americans. Not in 1960. Grant remembered vividly growing up in poverty in Lacooche, Florida, in a shack that had no hot water, no electric lights, or an indoor toilet, while his widowed mother supported her family on her menial wages working as a domestic in white people’s home and then trying to supplement her meager wages at the local citrus plant. He remembered the white kids who would bully the black kids and call them racist names, the white cop who pointed a gun at him while his partner kicked him in the rear, and the unequal school system where black kids received old school supplies deemed unfit for white kids, where he studied in a school that was really a house with blankets dividing the classrooms. There were the segregated spring training games in Florida, his Cleveland Indians teammates who yelled racist remarks at black fans, and his pitching coach, Ted Wilks, who in 1947 as a member of the St. Louis Cardinals tried to organize a boycott to avoid playing Jackie Robinson and the Brooklyn Dodgers, and as a pitcher regularly threw at the heads of black batters.
GV706.32 .M66 2017
Catalog Link – We Will Win the Day

Voices of Civil Rights Lawyers
Edited by Kent Spriggs

Cover of the book Voices of Civil Rights Lawyers

While bus boycotts, sit-ins, and other acts of civil disobedience were the engine of the civil rights movement, the law provided context for these events. Lawyers played a key role amid profound political and social upheavals, vindicating clients and together challenging white supremacy. Here, in their own voices, twenty-six lawyers reveal the abuses they endured and the barriers they broke as they fought for civil rights. These eyewitness accounts provide unique windows into some of the most dramatic moments in civil rights history–the 1965 Selma March, the first civil judgment against the Ku Klux Klan, the creation of ballot access for African Americans in Alabama, and the 1968 Democratic Convention. The narratives depict attorney-client relationships extraordinary in their mutual trust and commitment to risk-taking. White and black, male and female, northern- and southern-born, these recruits in the battle for freedom helped shape a critical chapter of American history.
E185.615 .V63 2018
Catalog Link – Voices of Civil Rights Lawyers

Let the People See
by Elliott J. Gorn

Cover of the book - Let the People See

Everyone knows the story of the murder of young Emmett Till. In August 1955, the fourteen-year-old Chicago boy was murdered in Mississippi for having–supposedly–flirted with a white woman named Carolyn Bryant, who was working behind the counter of a store. Emmett was taken from the home of a relative later that night by white men; three days later, his naked body was recovered in the Tallahatchie River, weighed down by a cotton-gin fan. Till’s killers were acquitted, but details of what had happened to him became public; the story gripped the country and sparked outrage. It continues to turn. The murder has been the subject of books and documentaries, rising and falling in number with anniversaries and tie-ins, and shows no sign of letting up. The Till murder continues to haunt the American conscience. Fifty years later, in 2005, the FBI reopened the case. New papers and testimony have come to light, and several participants, including Till’s mother, Mamie Till Mobley, have published autobiographies. Using this new evidence and a broadened historical context, Elliott Gorn delves into facets of the case never before studied and considers how and why the story of Emmett Till still resonates, and likely always will. Even as it marked a turning point, Gorn shows, hauntingly, it reveals how old patterns of thought and behavior linger in new faces, and how deeply embedded racism in America remains. Gorn does full justice to both Emmett and the Till Case–the boy and the symbol–and shows how and why their intersection illuminates a number of crossroads: of north and south, black and white, city and country, industrialization and agriculture, rich and poor, childhood and adulthood.
HV6465.M7 G67 2018
Catalog Link – Let the People See

2018-2023 Strategic Plan – Part 2, Values & Priorities

My last post detailed the new mission and vision of the McGraw-Page Library. This month’s post will explore the values and priorities that the Library uses to guide its decisions. Much of what is mentioned below is fairly self-explanatory, but if anyone would like to engage in a conversation about why the Library considers these values to be worth explicitly stating, I would love to hear from you.

Our Values

The McGraw-Page Library is committed to:

  • Liberal arts teaching, research, and scholarship
  • Ease of access
  • Innovation
  • Life-long learning
  • Preservation of knowledge
  • Continual improvement of collections
  • Intellectual and academic freedom
  • Collaboration with the campus community
  • Mutual respect and civility
  • Responsible stewardship

Our Priorities

  1. Randolph-Macon College Students
  2. Current & Emeriti Faculty
  3. Staff & Administrators
  4. Alumni
  5. Community Members

We felt it was beneficial to state these priorities in our strategic plan because we do weight the needs of these groups differently when we make decisions. Ideally, we would love to support all of these groups equally, but because both space and budgets are tight, choices sometimes need to be made. This list helps to guide those choices, especially when they are difficult.

Coming Soon: Tipasa Interlibrary Loan

Great news! Our interlibrary loan service is moving to the cloud! We have started the migration from the ILLiad platform to OCLC’s Tipasa product. We hope to be totally up and running on the new system by the start of the Spring 2019 Semester.

Some of the big advantages to Tipasa are:

  1. You can login to the system with your R-MC campus network login (YES! One less password to remember!)
  2. You will be able to get interlibrary loan notices by text message and/or email.

Want to give it a try? Follow these directions to place a request.

1. Log into your Tipasa User Portal:

2. Click on the “Create Request” Button:

3. Select the appropriate request type

Image shows request type buttons under Submit an Interlibrary Loan Request text

Request types are:

  • Book Loan or Chapter Copy 
  • Journal Article
  • Other Material: this could be a music CD, DVD, microform, or anything else.

4. Enter as much information as you have about the item you are requesting.

Only some fields are marked required with an asterisk (*), but please enter any and all the information you have. If you have a URL from the website where you learned about the source, please include that (that can go in the new “Where did you learn about this item” box!).

There is also an “Item not needed after” field. Please know that we always try to get materials as quickly as we can. If you need something very quickly, it’s best to follow up your request with an email to ill@rmc.edu, and we will do what we can. 

The more information you can give us, the better our chances of being able to get the item for you quickly. 

5. When finished entering your request details, click the “Submit Request” button at the bottom of the form.

Go ahead and give it a try if you’d like. Please note that in this beginning stage of Tipasa you will only be able to enter your requests manually. We are working with our database vendors now so that soon request information will automatically populate the request form like you are currently able to do with ILLiad.

Please contact Kelli Salmon at ill@rmc.edu if you have any questions about using Tipasa!

2018-2023 Strategic Plan – Part 1, Mission & Vision

In May 2018, staff of the McGraw-Page Library finalized the Library’s new strategic plan. Intended to set the strategic direction for the next five years, the strategic plan includes new mission and vision statements, and outlines the Library’s top priorities. My posts over the next few months will introduce the strategic plan. 

McGraw-Page Library Mission

The McGraw-Page Library supports the mission of the College by providing quality resources and innovative services that foster lifelong learning through exploration, discovery, and creativity.  

The Library is an integral part of Randolph-Macon College academic success. We provide resources that support student projects and, to a somewhat lesser extent, faculty research, and those resources are vetted according to our professional standards. That means that we don’t just add the latest bestseller on a topic, but we evaluate publishers, authors, and platforms and read reviews to ensure that high-quality resources are available. Similarly, we look at our services, and at ideas for new services, in light of campus need and the value that a service can provide the library and the College.

The goal to foster lifelong learning is found on many college campuses, and in many library mission statements, because the value of a college education cannot be truly experienced until after graduation. If learning only happens for the four years a student attends classes, its ability to impact the rest of their life is severely limited. But if a student can continue to learn, and thus adapt to the changes that life brings, their potential for success is higher. So the mission of the library is not to serve up ready-made, easily-digested packets of information, but to provide the tools needed for students to find what they need, explore what they’re interested in, and broaden their horizons. This puts students in control of the process and prepares them for the complex information environment that exists in the “real world.”

McGraw-Page Library Vision

The McGraw-Page Library strives to be the intellectual center of Randolph-Macon College. We encourage multi- and inter-disciplinarity through active participation in the academic and creative life of the College. We create vibrant, welcoming physical and virtual environments that support teaching, learning, research, and discovery. We collect, preserve, promote, and facilitate access to the best scholarly and educational resources in a variety of formats, and excel at innovative and responsive services. We educate members of the campus community in the use of academic and technological resources in order to prepare them for a complex information environment. We foster a culture of inclusiveness that reflects and respects the diversities of our community.

As the intellectual center of the R-MC campus, the Library would like to be a neutral space in which members of different disciplines, both students and faculty, can meet to share ideas and projects. It is easy to focus on one’s own major or area of interest and to simply be unaware of the research or conversations happening elsewhere. The library would like to be a place where interdisciplinarity and multidisciplinarity can thrive, where projects can be showcased, where students can learn from one another’s work.

We have a vision that our physical space will be intellectually and creatively inspiring to those who use it, as well as easy to navigate and use.  We plan to continue investing in our physical and digital collections so that they support the College’s evolving curriculum, as well as faculty research, and so that they reflect the diversity of the campus community. We view the library not as a passive repository for resources that are available on-demand, but as a proactive organization that is reaching out to users, engaging with them, and educating them about the tools, resources, and processes that can help them succeed both academically and beyond.

Next month’s post will explore the McGraw-Page Library’s values and priorities, and in March and April, our five strategic goals will be introduced.

Three on the Third – January

Three on the Third is a monthly series in which we highlight three books new to the library collection. Summaries of the books are provided from publisher’s websites, along with shelf location and a link to the item in the catalog.  This month we have three exciting new additions to our POP collection.

The Mamba Mentality 
by Kobe Bryant 

Cover of the book The Mamba Mentality.

The NBA great nicknamed “The Black Mamba” shares his knowledge and understanding of basketball, outlining his detailed approach to preparing both physically and mentally to succeed at the game and revealing the core of his “Mamba mentality.”
GV884.B794 A3 2018
Catalog Link – The Mamba Menta

 

Girl, Wash Your Face
by Rachel Hollis 

Cover of the book Girl, Wash Your Face.

Founder of the lifestyle website TheChicSite.com and CEO of her own media company, Rachel Hollis has created an online fan base by sharing tips for living a better life while fearlessly revealing the messiness of her own. Each chapter begins with a specific lie Hollis once believed that left her feeling overwhelmed, unworthy, or ready to give up. As a working mother, a former foster parent, and a woman who has dealt with insecurities about her body and relationships, she speaks with the insight and kindness of a BFF, helping women unpack the limiting mind-sets that destroy their self-confidence and keep them from moving forward. From her temporary obsession with marrying Matt Damon to a daydream involving hypnotic iguanas to her son’s request that she buy a necklace to “be like the other moms,” Hollis holds nothing back. With unflinching faith and tenacity, Hollis spurs other women to live with passion and hustle and to awaken their slumbering goals.
BV4527 .H658 2018
Catalog Link – Girl, Wash Your Face 

Hindsight & All the Things I Can’t See in Front of Me
by Justin Timberlake

Cover of the book Hindsight.

In his first book, Justin Timberlake creates a characteristically dynamic experience, one that combines an intimate, remarkable collection of anecdotes, reflections, and observations on his life and work with hundreds of candid photographs from his personal archives that range from his early years to the present day, in locations around the world, both on and off the stage. Justin discusses many aspects of his childhood, including his very early love of music and the inspiration behind many of his songs and albums. He talks about his songwriting process, offering the back story to many of his hits. He muses on his collaborations with other artists and directors, sharing the details of performances in concert, TV comedy, and film. He also reflects on who he is, examining what makes him tick, speaking candidly about fatherhood, family, close relationships, struggles, and his search to find an inner calm and strength. Living a creative life, observing and finding inspiration in the world, taking risks, and listening to an inner voice–this is Justin Timberlake.
ML420.T537 A3 2018
Catalog Link – Hindsight